TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

California moves to protect condors

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, 9:03 p.m.
 

By 1982, the number of California condors in the wild had dwindled to 22, an entire species nearly wiped out by, among other threats, lead poisoning from hunters' ammunition.

Though it was difficult to know for sure at the time because few condor carcasses were retrieved, researchers concluded that the big scavengers — whose wingspans can reach 9 feet or more — were consuming lead fragments in the carrion that makes up their diet and rapidly dying off.

Thirty-one years and $60 million later, the state's captive breeding program has brought the bird's population to 424, more than half living in the wild. Yet the main cause of death and illness for the condors remains the same: lead poisoning from ammunition in felled game and “gut piles” left by hunters who clean the carcasses in the field.

Today there is little doubt that lead is the primary threat, according to scientists, advocates and conservationists, because captive-bred birds are equipped with radio transmitters, captured and tested annually. The National Rifle Association remains one of the few major groups to deny the connection.

To break the cycle, Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, this month signed a ban on lead in hunting ammunition, making California the first state with such a law and settling a dispute that had been fought for decades. The ban will be phased in from 2015 to 2019.

“This is the last major source of lead that we knowingly discharge into the environment,” said Jeff Miller, conservation advocate for the Center for Biological Diversity, which campaigned hard for the new law. “We got it out of gasoline; we got it out of paint; we got it out of toys.”

Hunters have been using lead ammunition for centuries. But the metal is softer than alternatives such as copper alloys and steel, and it fragments easily, leaving particles in animal tissue that scavengers consume.

Lead's toxicity to humans and animals is well-established, and its danger to scavengers has been known since the first article on the subject was published in 1889, according to John McCamman, California-condor coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

A 2012 study by a team at the University of California at Santa Cruz found that 30 percent of blood samples taken from condors each year showed levels of lead high enough to cause significant health problems and that 20 percent of the free-flying birds required treatment to remove lead.

Miller said some states have begun checking for lead in venison donated to feeding sites.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Feds to protect 20 coral species
  2. Louisiana Gov. Jindal sues Obama over Common Core
  3. Johns’ ex-aide admits thefts
  4. Senate to look at earthquake risks at California nuke plant
  5. Defense rests in case against ex-Va. governor, first lady
  6. Texas man cleared of shooting drunken driver who killed his 2 sons
  7. Ferguson regains its peace, normalcy
  8. Pilot missing in Va. fighter crash
  9. Polygamists set to open winery in border town
  10. Forest Service OKs logging in California forests hit by wildfire
  11. Retailers warned about software
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.