TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Army vehicle runs into budget roadblock

AP
In this photo taken April 23, 2013, Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno is seen during testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Army’s hulking Abrams tank, built to dominate the enemy in combat, is proving equally hard to beat in a budget battle, because of a bipartisan push to spend an extra $436 million on tanks, which experts explicitly say are not needed. 'If we had our choice, we would use that money in a different way,' Odierno told The Associated Press this past week. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Daily Photo Galleries

By Reuters
Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Defense budget cuts will affect the Army's plan to develop a ground combat vehicle and most other acquisition programs, with some facing delays or cancellation, Army Secretary John McHugh said on Monday.

“I find it difficult to envision any significant number of our developmental initiatives that won't be affected,” McHugh said at the annual Association of the Army conference. “And some we'll have to cancel.”

McHugh singled out developing a ground combat vehicle and improving the Army's communications and computer network as priorities, but, he said, even those programs would have to be revamped if mandatory across-the-board budget cuts remained in place.

General Dynamics Corp., which built the M1A1 Abrams tank; BAE Systems Plc., maker of the Bradley fighting vehicle; and Boeing Co., which builds several helicopters for the Army and others were looking for clues to the impact of spending cuts.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno said the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle program, which is to replace the workhorse Humvees used by the military, and replacements for the UH-60, CH-47 and Apache helicopters were priorities.

“The bottom line is we can't afford all of that. And so we're going to have to make some tough decisions,” he said, adding that analysis was under way to help make those decisions.

He said the budget environment meant the Army might have to delay some weapons programs by four to five years.

Neither McHugh nor Odierno provided details on exactly which programs might be canceled, revamped or delayed.

Army acquisition chief Heidi Shyu later told reporters the Ground Combat Vehicle program and the Armed Aerial Scout program, which was aimed at replacing aging OH-58 Kiowa Warrior helicopters, were at risk unless Congress reversed across-the-board budget cuts mandated by sequestration.

“Either we are going to delay it or we're going to have to terminate it, or we're going to have to continue on and finish a certain phase,” Shyu said of the two programs.

She said understood industry's need for more certainty, but said the Army's acquisition plans were “lurching because our budget is lurching. We have no control over that.”

Acquisition programs were hardest hit because it took longer to generate savings from troop reductions, and operations and maintenance accounts were still stretched by the war in Afghanistan, Shyu said.

Decisions about future end strength and military readiness also played into acquisition decisions, Shyu said, noting that military commanders were having to weigh what capabilities they could give up, and what was “good enough.”

Shyu said the Army would continue to invest in research on lighter-weight armor and other promising technologies, as well as incremental upgrades to existing weapons.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Planet Mars likely had ocean, lost it, researchers find
  2. WVU, Va. coal company at odds over research papers
  3. Reports: Actor Ford seriously injured in small-plane crash in L.A.
  4. Feds weighed national standards but let North Dakota set regulations for oil trains’ safety
  5. Mother of 12-year-old shot dead by police criticizes Cleveland for faulting son, failing to apologize
  6. Foreign government gifts to family charity present candidacy hurdle for Hillary Clinton
  7. Ferguson’s white officer justified in shooting black man, feds find
  8. Natural gas royalties lawsuit hinges on transaction date
  9. Young white males replace older black men as OD victims as heroin deaths climb
  10. Tribune-Review poll: Cable news rises as network news falls
  11. Attorney General Holder backs change in civil rights law