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Napping nuke officers flout security measures

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The violations

Air Force officers entrusted with launch keys to nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missiles have been caught leaving open a blast door aimed at helping prevent a terrorist or other intruder from entering their underground command post, officials told The Associated Press. A look at key elements of the violations by two sets of Air Force officers:

• In both cases this year, the missile crew commander and the deputy crew commander were disciplined for having left open the blast door to their underground launch control center while one of them was napping.

• At Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., the person who had been asleep initially lied about the door being open but later confessed, saying her crew commander had encouraged her to lie.

• At Minot Air Force Base, N.D., one of the crew members acknowledged having committed the same transgression numerous times without getting caught.

• The Air Force says that in neither case was the security of the nuclear missile compromised because of other safeguards in place.

Other problems within the Air Force nuclear missile force were revealed this year by The Associated Press:

• In April, 19 missile crew members in the 91st Missile Wing at Minot were deemed temporarily unfit for duty and given weeks of remedial training. The wing's deputy commander of operations complained of “rot” in the force. Later, the officer in charge of the 91st's missile crew training and proficiency was relieved of duty.

• A RAND Corp. survey of officers and airmen in the missile force found complaints about poor leadership, poor working conditions and concern that they were in a dead-end career.

• In August, the 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom failed a safety and security inspection. Nine days later, the officer in charge of security forces there was relieved of duty.

• This month, the Air Force fired Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, commander of the 20th Air Force, which is responsible for the entire Minuteman 3 missile force, amid an investigation of an alcohol-related complaint.

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By The Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, 7:33 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Twice this year alone, Air Force officers entrusted with the launch keys to nuclear-tipped missiles have been caught leaving open a blast door that is intended to help prevent a terrorist or other intruder from entering their underground command post, Air Force officials said.

The blast doors are never to be left open if one of the crew members inside is asleep — as was the case in these instances — out of concern for the damage an intruder could cause, including the compromising of secret launch codes.

Such transgressions are rarely revealed publicly, but officials with direct knowledge of Air Force intercontinental ballistic missile operations told the AP that such violations have happened, undetected, many more times than in the cases of the two launch crew commanders and two deputy commanders who were given administrative punishments this year.

The blast door violations are a sign of serious trouble in the handling of the nation's nuclear arsenal. The AP has reported on a series of problems within the ICBM force, including a failed safety inspection, the temporary sidelining of launch officers deemed unfit for duty and the abrupt firing last week of the two-star general in charge.

The crews who operate the missiles are trained to follow rules without fail, including the prohibition against having the blast door open when only one crew member is awake, because the costs of a mistake are so high. Sleep breaks are allowed during a 24-hour shift, known as an “alert.” But a written rule says the door — meant to keep others out and to protect the crew from the blast effects of a direct nuclear strike — must be closed if one officer is napping.

The officers, known as “missileers,” are custodians of keys that could launch nuclear hell. The warheads on the missiles are capable of a nuclear yield many times that of the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945.

“The only way that you can have a crew member be in ‘rest status' is if that blast door is shut and there is no possibility of anyone accessing the launch control center,” said Lt. Gen. James Kowalski, the commander of Air Force Global Strike Command. He is responsible for the entire force of 450 Minuteman 3 missiles and the Air Force's nuclear-capable bombers.

The written Air Force instruction on ICBM weapon safety, last updated in 2011, says, “One crew member at a time may sleep on duty, but both must be awake and capable of detecting an unauthorized act if ... the Launch Control Center blast door is open” or if someone other than the crew is present.

The blast door is not the first line of defense. An intruder intent on taking control of a missile command post first would face many layers of security before encountering the blast door, which — when closed — is secured by 12 hydraulically operated steel pins. The door is at the base of an elevator shaft. Entry to that elevator is controlled from an above-ground building. ICBM fields are monitored with security cameras and patrolled regularly by armed Air Force guards.

Each underground launch center, known as a capsule for its pill-like shape, monitors and operates 10 Minuteman 3 missiles.

The missiles stand in reinforced concrete silos and are linked to the control center by buried communications cables. The ICBMs are split evenly among “wings” based in North Dakota, Wyoming and Montana. Each wing is divided into three squadrons, each responsible for 50 missiles.

In neither of the two reported violations was security of the crews' missiles compromised, the Air Force said in response to questions from the AP, because of “the multiple safeguards and other protections in place.” But these were clear-cut violations of what the Air Force calls “weapon system safety rules,” meant to be strictly enforced in light of the potentially catastrophic consequences of a breach of nuclear security.

In the two episodes confirmed by the Air Force, the multi-ton concrete-and-steel door that seals the entrance to the underground launch control center was deliberately left open while one of two crew members inside napped.

One of the officers punished for a blast door violation in April at the 91st Missile Wing at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., admitted during questioning by superiors to having done it other times without getting caught.

Both officers involved in that case were given what the military calls nonjudicial punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice rather than court-martialed. One was ordered to forfeit $2,246 in pay for two months and received a letter of reprimand, according to Lt. Col. John Sheets, spokesman for Air Force Global Strike Command. The other launch officer, who admitted to having committed the same violation “a few” times previously, was given a letter of admonishment, Sheets said.

The other confirmed blast door violation happened in May at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. In that case, a person who entered the capsule to do maintenance work realized that the deputy crew commander was asleep with the door open and reported the violation to superiors.

 

 
 


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