Share This Page

Classes resume at Massachusetts school where teacher was slain

| Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, 6:45 p.m.
REUTERS
Members of the school soccer team gather at a makeshift memorial for teacher Colleen Ritzer outside the high school where she taught in Danvers, Mass., on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013.

DANVERS, Mass. — Students in the Massachusetts school where a classmate allegedly killed a teacher returned on Friday, surrounded by extra safety measures as well as tributes to the victim, including trees adorned with pink ribbons, her favorite color.

Classes resumed in Danvers High School two days after student Philip Chism, 14, was charged with murder in the death of Colleen Ritzer, a 24-year-old math teacher. School had been canceled the previous two days.

The day was stressful and difficult, said freshman Cambria Cloutier, 14.

“Everyone was just kind of crying,” she said.

Cloutier had class with Ritzer and Chism, and she returned to the classroom to find it stripped of pictures and handwriting. “There was basically no life in it,” she said.

Outside the school, an electronic sign displayed a tweet that Ritzer posted this summer: “No matter what happens in life, be good to people. Being good to people is a wonderful legacy to leave behind.”

“RIP Miss Ritzer. Gone, not forgotten,” was written in the school colors of blue and white on the windows of a pickup truck in the student parking lot.

Caio Silva, a senior and varsity soccer player, said he knew Chism and Ritzer. He said he and his teammates are helping each other.

“A lot of the guys are really shocked. A lot of guys are down, really upset,” he said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.