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Mother, 4 kids stabbed to death in Brooklyn; house guest arrested

| Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, 9:33 p.m.

NEW YORK — A Chinese immigrant who neighbors said struggled to survive in America was arrested on Sunday on five counts of murder in the stabbing deaths of his cousin's wife and her four children in their Brooklyn home — using a butcher knife.

The suspect, 25-year-old Mingdong Chen, implicated himself in the killings late Saturday in the Sunset Park neighborhood, police said.

“They were cut and butchered with a kitchen knife,” said Chief of Department Philip Banks III.

Two girls, 9-year-old Linda Zhuo and 7-year-old Amy Zhuo, were pronounced dead at the scene, along with the youngest child, 1-year-old William Zhuo — all attacked in a back bedroom, police said. Their brother, 5-year-old Kevin Zhuo, and 37-year-old mother, Qiao Zhen Li, were taken to hospitals, where they were pronounced dead.

Chen is a cousin of the children's father and had been staying at the home for the past week or so, Banks said.

Chen came to the United States from China in 2004, the chief said, but neighbors say he could never hold down a job.

“He made a very soft comment that since he came to this country, everybody seems to be doing better than him,” the chief said. “We're not really sure what that means.”

The chief said Chen speaks only Mandarin Chinese despite being in the United States for almost a decade.

On Saturday night, Chen apparently had been acting in a “suspicious” way that concerned Li, Banks said. She tried to call her husband but couldn't reach him.

Banks said Li then called her mother-in-law in China, who was unsuccessful in reaching her son. The mother-in-law reached out to her daughter in the same Brooklyn neighborhood, Banks said.

She and her husband came to the house and banged on the door. When it opened, they faced a grisly sight: a man they didn't know, covered with blood. The couple called 911, and officers investigating another matter nearby responded quickly, Banks said.

“It's a scene you'll never forget,” he said. The victims had wounds in their necks and torsos.

Banks said Chen had at first resisted arrest and, while being processed, assaulted a police officer.

Bob Madden, who lives nearby, was walking his dog Saturday night when he saw a man being escorted from the two-family brick house by police. He was barefoot, wearing jeans, and “he was staring, he was expressionless,” Madden said.

Yuan Gao, a cousin of the mother, stood on the street on Sunday along with the neighborhood's mostly Chinese residents. Some said that at Chen's latest temporary home, days before the killings, late-night arguments were loud enough to be heard outside.

Gao said Chen was emotionally unstable. “He's crazy,” she said. Chen kept getting fired from restaurants after only a few weeks on the job, she said.

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