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Next 'Obamacare' woe: Fewer choices

Heath care inflation reaches 50-year low

A Council of Economic Advisers report released on Wednesday found that health care inflation is the lowest it has been in 50 years, and White House officials said the trend could lead to more jobs and lower-than-expected costs.

Reduced health care costs for employers could lead to 200,000 to 400,000 new jobs per year by the second half of the decade, said Jason Furman, the chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, 7:27 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Once they get the website fixed, then what? Keeping your doctors and hospitals may be the next vexing challenge for Americans in the health plans that resulted from President Obama's law.

Obama promised people could keep their doctors. But in many states, the new plans appear to offer a narrow choice of hospitals and doctors. Overall, it's shaping up as less choice than what people get through Medicare or employer-based coverage. And it can get complicated tracking down which medical providers are in what plans.

“The next shoe is going to drop sometime after Jan. 1, when people actually start using their plans,” said health economist Gail Wilensky, who ran Medicare for President George H.W. Bush. “Whether or not they can keep their doctor is going to depend on whether their doctor was chosen — or wanted to be — part of a plan on the (insurance) exchange.”

Concerns are being raised.

Narrow networks are part of the economic trade-off for keeping premiums under control in Obama's health insurance markets, the new gateway to coverage for people who don't have job-based plans.

Exchange plans are required to take all applicants, cover broad benefits and provide robust financial protection against catastrophic illness. In return for that, something else has to give. The result: limited choices and significant out-of-pocket costs through deductibles and co-payments.

“To get that low premium, the way to get there is by having a more limited or narrow provider network,” said Matthew Eyles, a vice president of Avalere Health, a market analysis firm that is following developments.

The administration says none of that takes away from what will be a historic improvement for the uninsured. Exchanges “will vastly increase uninsured Americans' access to providers, giving them an alternative to the emergency room or community health centers,” said Joanne Peters, spokeswomanfor the Health and Human Services Department. The health care law sets standards for insurers to provide adequate networks, she added.

But the American Medical Association has questions.

“Although it may be too early to reach any definitive conclusions, we are monitoring the adequacy of the exchange networks and will be analyzing the impact of these restrictive strategies on patient access to care,” said Dr. Ardis Dee Hoven, the organization's president.

In some states, it's been a problem. It's magnified in New Hampshire because just one insurer, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, is offering plans there through the new marketplace. The company's new network for individual plans excludes 10 of the state's 26 frontline hospitals.

That was a rude awakening for Dr. Jocelyn Caple, who works at one of the excluded hospitals, Frisbie Memorial in Rochester, N.H., where she's president of the medical staff. She and her family are covered under their own policy with Anthem.

“We all use Frisbie physicians,” she said. Although there's another facility she could go to next year, “it's pretty shocking not be able to come to your own hospital.”

As an Obama supporter, Caple is troubled. The hospital is mulling a lawsuit.

All these years, Frisbie has performed a balancing act caring for a mix of insured and uninsured patients, she said. “Now at a time when you would have thought that the coming of insurance would make it easier to care for those patients, we are being denied the opportunity to care for them,” she added. “It's pretty disturbing.”

 

 
 


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