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Former Boston crime boss Bulger's jewelry, clothes could go to auction

| Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013, 6:30 p.m.

BOSTON — Former Boston crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger could soon see some of his jewelry, clothes and other belongings on the auction block.

The U.S. Marshals Service will auction off many of the items seized from Bulger's California apartment upon his arrest two years ago, The Boston Globe reported Saturday. Authorities say the profits will be split among the families of those killed by Bulger.

Federal prosecutors told the newspaper that the items belonging to Bulger and his girlfriend are in storage in Massachusetts and are being appraised.

Officials believe the highest-value items include a claddagh ring estimated to be worth $48,000 and Bulger's replica 1986 Stanley Cup championship ring valued at about $3,000.

The 84-year-old Bulger was sentenced this month to life in prison. He was found guilty in August by a federal jury in 11 of the 19 killings he was accused of, along with dozens of other gangland crimes, including shakedowns and money laundering.

Bulger also owned a boxing mannequin topped with a hat that was apparently propped in the window of his apartment to make it look as though there was someone keeping lookout.

Other items include binoculars, a telescope, camouflage clothing, nine fedoras, 27 pairs of sunglasses, ceramic poodle salt and pepper shakers, assorted porcelain cats and hundreds of books, many with Bulger's handwritten notes scrawled in the margins. There's also a McCain/Palin campaign button and a God Bless America poster.

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