TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Military judge allows alleged 9/11 mastermind to build torture case

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Miami Herald
Monday, Dec. 2, 2013, 8:21 p.m.
 

A military judge has ordered the prison at Guantanamo to let defense attorneys photograph scars on the ankles and wrists of the waterboarded, alleged 9/11 mastermind, Khalid Sheik Mohammed, to preserve evidence in his death-penalty case.

But Army Col. James Pohl made it clear in his ruling, unsealed on the eve of Thanksgiving, that the public may never see the images that defense lawyers consider proof that the CIA tortured him in years of secret custody where U.S. agents waterboarded Mohammed 183 times.

Prosecutors, who don't concede the men were tortured before arriving at Guantanamo, wanted Mohammed and co-defendant Walid bin Attash to pose for military photographers and have Guantanamo prison commanders control the photos.

Defense lawyers called it an intrusion into the attorney-client relationship, and Pohl agreed.

Mohammed and his four fellow defendants in the case are held in a secret prison on the Navy base at Guantanamo because the CIA program that subjected them to harsh overseas interrogations for the George W. Bush administration is classified.

Pohl didn't rule that the photos of Mohammed and bin Attash would necessarily be classified. In the event intelligence authorities don't classify the images, however, he invoked a war-court protective order he devised.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Global lion population falling primarily because of loss of habitat, experts say
  2. Dusty Atlantic Ocean thwarts tropical storms
  3. Clintons hauled in $139M in past 8 years
  4. El Niño helps, harms economies
  5. Oklahoma earthquakes shut down wells
  6. Christian college in Illinois to stop providing health care over Obamacare
  7. San Francisco’s Chinatown clings to roots amid tech boom
  8. Georgia debates Confederate carving set in stone and state law
  9. In dispute over coal mine project, two ways of life hang in the balance
  10. Georgia school returns Cosby’s money
  11. Republicans seek firing of IRS chief in feud over missing emails