TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Bratton returns to lead New York City police force

Getty Images
New York police Commissioner-designate Bill Bratton embraces a policy of devoting resources to curb minor crimes with the expectation of reducing major crimes.

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013, 5:51 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — William Bratton, whose tenure as New York City police commissioner in the 1990s was marked by a decline in crime and clashes with then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, has been chosen to lead the nation's largest police force again.

Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio announced the appointment on Thursday, saying Bratton is a “proven crime fighter” who knows how to keep the city safe.

He is being named to lead the 34,000-officer department as it tries to maintain a historic drop in crime and an extensive counterterrorism program, even as its tactics have become increasingly scrutinized. Bratton, who has led the Boston and Los Angeles police departments, will succeed Raymond Kelly, the New York Police Department's longest-serving commissioner.

“Wherever he's gone, there's been a reduction in crime,” said de Blasio, a Democrat who takes office on Jan 1.

Over and over, de Blasio stressed that Bratton will try to continue the city's record public safety gains while improving police-community relations, which he said he believes have been strained by the police tactic known as stop and frisk.

The tactic allows police to stop anyone believed to be acting suspiciously. Its supporters say it has driven down crime, while its critics say it unfairly targets black and Latino men.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Ohio cop indicted on murder charge in traffic-stop shooting
  2. Hope dims for Fla. teens lost at sea
  3. Family finds $1M gold treasure in Florida
  4. They still have snow in Buffalo
  5. Cat found alive aboard sunken boat pulled from Lake Havasu
  6. Clinton focuses on economy’s future in speech
  7. Minn. man accused of slaying protected Zimbabwean lion says he thought the trip was legal
  8. Cruz calls his party’s Senate leader a liar
  9. San Francisco’s Chinatown clings to roots amid tech boom
  10. Cruz chided over remarks in prelude to Ex-Im Bank vote
  11. Republicans seek firing of IRS chief in feud over missing emails