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U.S. fundraising mittens made in China

| Monday, Dec. 16, 2013, 7:12 p.m.
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Bobsled Olympic hopeful Jazmine Fenlator (left) and Paralympic alpine skiing hopeful Alana Nichols attend the 100 Days Out Sochi Winter Olympics Event at NBC's 'Today' show on Oct. 29, 2013, in New York City.

The outside of the mittens says “Go USA.” The insides says “Made in China.”

Less than two years after being criticized for having the U.S. Olympic team's uniforms made in China, the U.S. Olympic Committee has another wardrobe malfunction on its hands.

The red-white-and-blue mittens it's selling to raise funds for winter athletes were produced in China.

It says so right on the tag on the inside.

The USOC is charging $14 a pair for the blue gloves that have the word “Go” embroidered in red on the left mitten and “USA” on the right. Also part of that left mitten is the tag, which says the gloves are “100% acrylic,” “One Size Fits Most” and “Made in China.”

USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said the “official” mittens being worn by the athletes at the opening ceremony are made in America. They're also available to the public for $98 a pair on the Ralph Lauren website.

But the federation was going for a lower price point for its fundraiser. With the games more than a month away, it has raised $500,000 from the mitten sales.

“We wanted to create a fundraising opportunity where almost anyone could support Team USA,” Sandusky said.

The USOC has tried to be extra careful about where its goods are manufactured since running into trouble when news broke that its 2012 team uniforms were produced in China. Congressmen from both parties piled onto the PR gaffe, with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., saying, “I think they should take all the uniforms, put them in a big pile and burn them, and start all over again.”

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