TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Anonymous donor gives $650K for Nebraska bridge

AP
Federal officials for the first time provided demographic data on enrollees, confirming concerns that fewer young and healthy Americans than hoped for have sought coverage under President Obama’s signature legislative achievement, the Affordable Care Act.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, 3:27 p.m.
 

LINCOLN, Neb. — Three years after a flood wiped out part of a bridge spanning the Elkhorn River in Neligh, residents of the small northeastern Nebraska city received a festive surprise: an anonymous, $650,000 donation to rebuild the historic structure.

The city received a check from the donor's Chicago-based attorney last week saying they can use it to rebuild the steel-truss Old Mill Bridge on the condition that residents never try to discover who contributed the money. If they learn the donor's identity by accident, city officials must stay sworn to secrecy.

The donation will allow officials to move forward with a project that would have languished for years.

“I was amazed when I first heard — and then we had to keep it quiet for a month or two,” said Neligh Mayor Jeri Anderson. “I wanted to shout from the rooftops, ‘It's going to happen!' ”

The bridge on the city's southern edge had just turned 100 years old in 2010 when a flood swept a section of the structure away and devoured about 100 feet of the Elkhorn River's south bank.

Neligh City Attorney Joe McNally said the federal government approved funding to repair the bridge, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. But the rules only allowed officials to restore the bridge to its original condition, without accounting for the large chunk of the river bank that had been washed away. Without a connection to the south bank, some residents dubbed it Nebraska's “Bridge to Nowhere.”

McNally said the city had approved debt funding for several unrelated construction projects, so local government aid was unlikely in the near future. A private fundraising effort yielded only a few thousand dollars.

The donor insisted on anonymity, going so far as to require city officials to sign a confidentiality agreement. After six weeks of discussion, a check arrived via FedEx on Dec. 16.

“We have no idea who it was, if they have local ties, or how they discovered the project,” McNally said. Without the donation, reconnecting the bridge “would have been a pretty difficult process. ”

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Secret Service chief resigns after security lapses
  2. U.S. pans Israeli housing project
  3. Mexico expected to free former Marine soon
  4. West Virginia has tallied 45,500 storage tanks so far
  5. Threat leads to evacuation of Sandy Hook school
  6. Murder charges dropped against sergeant who shot 2 unarmed Iraqi boys
  7. MIT: Global Energy Use, CO2 May Double By 2100
  8. FCC backs end to NFL broadcast blackouts
  9. Secret Service chief endures blistering glare of Congress’ questions over White House breach
  10. First Ebola case in U.S. confirmed in Dallas
  11. FBI director tells off Apple, Google
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.