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Obama seals deals on budget, defense

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
 

HONOLULU — Rounding out a tough and frustrating year, President Obama signed a bipartisan budget deal on Thursday easing spending cuts and a defense bill cracking down on sexual assault in the military, as the president and Congress began pivoting to the midterm election year ahead.

Obama put his signature on the hard-fought bills while vacationing in Hawaii with his family. The signing marks one of Obama's last official acts in a year beset by a partial government shutdown, a near-default by the Treasury, a calamitous health care rollout and near-perpetual congressional gridlock.

Although the budget deal falls short of the grand bargain that Obama and congressional Republicans aspired to, it ends the cycle of fiscal brinkmanship — for now — by preventing another shutdown for nearly two more years.

But the rare moment of comity may be short-lived. Hanging over the start of the new year is a renewed fight over raising the nation's borrowing limit, which the Treasury says must be resolved by late February or early March to avert an unprecedented default. Both sides are positioning behind customary hard-line positions, with Republicans insisting they want concessions before raising the debt limit and Obama insisting he won't negotiate.

The last vestiges of 2013's legislative wrangling behind him, Obama's attention turns to major challenges and potential bright spots in the year ahead. In late January, Obama will give his fifth State of the Union address, setting his agenda for the final stretch before the 2014 midterm elections, in which all of the House and one-third of the Senate are on the ballot.

The elections could drown out much of Obama's effort to focus attention on his own, key agenda items.

Those include his signature health care law. The critical enrollment period for insurance exchanges closes on March 31. Also at midyear, Obama will seek to secure a comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran before a six-month deal struck in November runs out.

“Hopefully, the president has finally learned that if he wants a productive second term, we need to focus on finding areas of common ground,” said Brendan Buck, a spokesman for House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio.

Wary of letting expectations get too high, Obama's advisers have been careful not to read too much into Congress' success in trumping pessimistic expectations and pulling off a modest, end-of-year budget deal.

On Thursday, senior Obama adviser Dan Pfeiffer called for a renewed focus in the new year on job creation, an unemployment insurance extension and a boost in the minimum wage.

“While it's too early to declare a new era of bipartisanship, what we've seen recently is that Washington is capable of getting things done when it wants to,” Pfeiffer said. “There's an opportunity next year for this town to do its job and make real progress.”

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