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Many expect their fortunes to improve in new year

| Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013, 6:57 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Large number of Americans see 2013 as anything but a banner year and aren't reluctant to wave goodbye on New Year's Eve, an AP-Times Square poll says, reflecting anxiety stretching from the corridors of power in Washington to corporate boardrooms, statehouses, and city and town halls.

Although the poll shows that people generally are looking forward to the new year with optimism and no blatant sense of foreboding, it also unmasks pent-up worries about international crises and instability, and concerns at home about the standard of living, health care and schools.

Good year or good riddance?

On the whole, Americans rate their own experience in 2013 more positively than negatively, but when asked to assess the year for the United States or the world at large, things turn sour.

• All told, 32 percent say 2013 was a better year for them than 2012, while 20 percent say it was worse and 46 percent say the two years were about the same. Young people were more apt to see improvement: 40 percent of people younger than age 30 called 2013 a better year than 2012, compared with 25 percent of people 65 or older.

• The public splits evenly on how the year turned out for the country, with 25 percent saying it was better than 2012, and 25 percent saying it was worse. As with most questions about the state of affairs in the United States these days, there's a sharp partisan divide. Democrats are more apt to say the country turned out better in 2013 than 2012 (37 percent) than are Republicans (17 percent).

• Thinking about the world at large, 30 percent say 2013 was worse than 2012, while just 20 percent say it was better.

• But the outlook for the new year is positive: 49 percent think their own fortunes will improve in 2014; 14 percent are anticipating the new year to be a downgrade from the old. Thirty-four percent say they don't expect much to change.

Where's the party?

• Most Americans — 54 percent — say they'll be ringing in the new year at home, while 1 in 5 are heading to a friend's or family member's house. Only 8 percent say they'll go to a bar, restaurant or other organized event.

• Younger Americans are least apt to spend the holiday at home: 39 percent of those younger than age 30 will celebrate at home, 33 percent at someone else's home, 13 percent at a bar or other venue.

• Regardless of their own time zone, nearly 6 in 10 say they'll watch at least some of the celebration from New York City's Times Square.

Countdown companions

Wherever they're spending the holiday, most Americans prefer the company of family. Asked with whom they want to be when the clock strikes midnight, 83 percent name a family member.

• On a holiday often sealed with a kiss, nearly 4 in 10 say they most want to be next to their spouse, and 13 percent cite a significant other or romantic interest as a preferred companion. Parents like to be with their children, more than the children like to be with their parents.

• Less conventional choices: 2 percent cite their pets, 3 percent God, Jesus or their religious congregation, and less than 1 percent said they wanted to ring it in with their co-workers.

• Of course, some opt out altogether: 18 percent say they're not planning to celebrate on New Year's Eve, and 9 percent say there's no one with whom they'd like to party, preferring instead their pillow, TiVo or their own thoughts.

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