TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Congress is back in action — and divided as ever

Daily Photo Galleries

By USA Today
Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, 6:21 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Congress resumes work on Monday as divided as ever on the nation's priorities and focused on themes it hopes will resonate with voters before November's midterm elections.

Democrats, who have seized on income inequality as a major theme of the 2014 campaign, are pushing to increase the $7.25-an-hour federal minimum wage and have scheduled a test vote Monday night in the Senate on a bill to extend long-term unemployment insurance for people out of work for 26 weeks or longer.

Those benefits lapsed Dec. 28 for 1.3 million people when Congress left for the holidays without taking action. Republicans have said they are open to extending benefits but want the cost of doing so offset by spending cuts and other changes.

Over the weekend, President Obama and leaders in the Democrat-controlled Senate challenged Republicans to oppose the unemployment legislation, which would extend benefits by three months.

“Republicans in Congress have to get away from being a Republican in Congress,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said on CBS' “Face the Nation” on Sunday. “They are just out of touch with what's going on in America today.”

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican viewed as a possible presidential contender in 2016, said Democrats are pressing the issue because “they want desperately to talk about anything but Obamacare.” He spoke on CNN's “State of the Union.”

For their part, Republicans who control the House pledged to remain focused on the health care law and the rocky rollout of the HealthCare.gov website. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said the law “is broken and cannot be fixed.”

Cantor said the House Republican leaders will push legislation to ensure the security of personal data collected from individuals who have enrolled in private insurance through the federal government's health care site. He said Republicans plan to closely monitor the administration's enrollment numbers.

“Our efforts will be shaped by our desire to help protect the American people from the harmful effects of this law,” Cantor said in a memo released Friday, outlining House GOP priorities.

Reid acknowledged an “awful” start to the health care website. But he said changes to the site have improved its function, and he hailed the law's other provisions, such as allowing young people to remain on their parent's health insurance plans until age 26.

“It's already working,” Reid said. “Republicans should get a life and start talking about doing something constructively.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Gun used by agent who helped jail Capone headed to museum
  2. Global warming is slowing down the circulation of the oceans — with potentially dire consequences
  3. Bulk calling data won’t be collected
  4. American crash victims: U.S. government contractor, daughter
  5. Military leaders leery of letting in transgenders
  6. Keep Gitmo prisoners swapped for Bergdahl out of fight, senator says
  7. Feds arrest guardsman, cousin for terror plot on military facility
  8. Sen. Reid follows same old script for Democrats as he endorses Schumer as successor
  9. National briefs
  10. Mysteries of dark matter come to light in Science study
  11. Christie rails against high N.J. estate tax