TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Jobless benefits bill stalls in bickering Senate

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, 9:30 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Legislation to resurrect long-term jobless legislation stalled in the Senate on Thursday, triggering recriminations from both sides of the political aisle despite earlier expressions of optimism that benefits might soon be restored for more than 1 million victims of the recession.

Gridlock asserted itself after majority Democrats offered to pay for a 10-month extension of a scaled-back program of benefits, then refused to permit Republicans even to seek any changes.

Instead, Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., accused Republicans of “continually denigrating our economy, our president and frankly, I believe, our country.”

Sen. Dan Coats of Indiana, one of a half-dozen Republicans who helped advance the bill over an initial hurdle earlier in the week, said he had not been consulted on any compromise.

Echoing complaints by other members of his party, he said that under Reid's leadership he has been relegated to the sidelines.

Indiana voters “didn't send me here to be told just to sit down and forget it,” he said.

At issue was a struggle over the possible resurrection of a program that expired on Dec. 28, immediately cutting off benefits of roughly $256 weekly for more than 1.3 million job seekers hurt by the recession.

The measure is the first to come before the Senate in the election year, and since Monday has become ground zero of a competition between the political parties to appeal to hard-hit victims of the longest recession in more than a half-century.

While unemployment has receded in recent months, long-term jobless is high by historical standards.

Despite the squabbling, lawmakers in both parties said the effort to find a compromise would continue.

“We're still trying to work through this,” said Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., whose state has 9 percent unemployment.

At midday Thursday, Reid had expressed optimism about the chances for compromise, and Democratic officials said talks with Republicans were focused on a scaled-back program that is fully paid for and would provide up to 31 weeks of benefits for the long-term unemployed.

The officials said the proposal would run through the late fall, and the price tag — approximately $18 billion — would be offset through cuts elsewhere in the budget so deficits would not rise.

Reid told reporters that he was “cautiously optimistic” about a compromise emerging later in the day, and said he had held meetings with fellow Nevadan Dean Heller, a Republican, but provided no details.

By midafternoon, when Reid formally outlined the proposal, there was no evident Republican support for it, and each side accused the other of an unwillingness to compromise.

Chandler Smith, a spokeswoman for Heller, said the senator met with Reid and Reed during the day and has been talking with Republicans as well, although he spent part of the day at a hospital for repair of a cast.

Heller “remains optimistic, and appreciates that Sen. Reid has been negotiating in good faith to reach a deal,” Smith said.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. GOP governors don’t see ‘Obamacare’ going away
  2. West Virginia University warns students over riots
  3. Ebola watch lists to shrink
  4. Forensics support Ferguson police officer in shooting of unarmed black teen
  5. Virginia police hunt for clues near where body found
  6. Premier Cubism collection shared in N.Y.
  7. Riots shake Keene State College in New Hampshire
  8. Probe of silencers leads to web of Pentagon secrets
  9. Record number of black candidates seeking office nationwide
  10. Gay-rights activists endorse HIV drug
  11. Scientists unravel genetics of height
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.