TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Military ethics concerns spread to Navy nuclear program

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, 8:12 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — The Navy said on Tuesday it is investigating about 30 senior sailors linked to alleged cheating on tests meant to qualify them to train others to operate naval nuclear power reactors.

Sidelining about one-fifth of the reactor training contingent, about 30, may pinch the Navy's training program, senior officials said.

It is the second exam-cheating scandal to hit the military this year, on top of disclosures in recent months of ethical lapses at all ranks in the military.

Unlike an Air Force cheating probe that has implicated nearly 100 officers responsible for land-based nuclear missiles that stand ready for short-notice launch, those implicated in the Navy investigation have no responsibility for nuclear weapons. The Air Force probe is centered on Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., but could spread to its two other nuclear missile bases, in North Dakota and Wyoming.

The Navy said the implicated sailors are accused of having cheated on written tests they must pass to be certified as instructors at a nuclear propulsion school at Charleston, S.C. The Navy uses two nuclear reactors there to train sailors for duty aboard any of dozens of submarines and aircraft carriers around the world whose on-board reactors provide propulsion. They are not part of any weapons systems.

The accused sailors previously had undergone reactor operations training at Charleston before deploying aboard a nuclear-power vessel. In the normal course of career moves, they returned to Charleston to serve as instructors, for which they must pass requalification exams.

Adm. John Richardson, director of the Navy's nuclear propulsion program, said a number of senior sailors are alleged to have provided test information to peers. He was not more specific, but one official said the information was shared from the sailors' home computers, which could be a violation of security rules because information about nuclear reactors operations is classified.

Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the chief of naval operations, said he is upset to learn of the breakdown in discipline.

“To say I am disappointed would be an understatement,” Greenert said. “We expect more from our sailors — especially our senior sailors.”

Neither Greenert nor Richardson identified the rank of the alleged cheaters but described them as senior enlisted members. There are about 150 nuclear power reactor instructors at the Charleston site. With about 30 of them banned, at least temporarily, from performing their duties, the training program might suffer.

Richardson said he could not discuss possible disciplinary action against those involved because the probe was ongoing. However, he said that anyone in the naval nuclear power program — either in a training setting or aboard a ship at sea — who is caught cheating would usually be removed from the program and “generally” would be kicked out of the Navy.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Study touts benefits of full-day preschool
  2. Some in Congress turn down retirement pension, but many cash in
  3. News Alert
  4. Immigrants warned of increase in scams
  5. McCarthy-era felon: Lies doomed me
  6. Heart stent implanted, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg goes home
  7. Justices consider social media, free speech
  8. Cathedral may host slave trade museum
  9. Kahlo’s workplace to be reimagined in New York Botanical Garden
  10. Oregon police dog fired from job
  11. Supreme Court will hear challenge to EPA’s power-plant rules
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.