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Winter again slaps New England; parts of Maine get 16 inches

| Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014, 8:27 p.m.

BOSTON — The latest blast of snow to hit New England dumped more than a foot in part of Massachusetts and packed heavy winds that left thousands without power on Sunday on Cape Cod.

Coastal areas in Maine and south of Boston appeared to get the worst of the storm overnight. In Massachusetts, 15 inches of snow was reported in Sandwich, and 10 inches was reported in New Bedford and Plymouth.

Wind gusts of more than 50 mph were reported on Saturday night on Cape Cod, where utility NStar said about 2,600 customers were without power. Crews from Connecticut crossed into Massachusetts to help fix the power outages, but more than 13,000 customers started the morning without power.

“When they called us, they said, ‘pack five days' worth of clothes,' ” lineman Dan Buchanan told NECN-TV. “Whatever it takes.”

In Maine, 17 inches of snow was reported in Hancock, and 16.7 in Eastport, the easternmost city in the United States. The Department of Transportation said it deployed 375 trucks statewide at the height of the storm on Saturday night.

In Rhode Island, transportation officials warned drivers to expect difficult travel conditions through the Monday morning commute, blaming strained road salt supplies that forced them to apply a limited amount before the storm hit.

The Rhode Island Department of Transportation said it was applying sand for traction on roadways that were covered with snow and ice but that roads were likely to refreeze. Rhode Island received between 3 and 8 inches of snow, according to the National Weather Service.

The weekend snowstorm hit on the heels of a storm that blanketed the East Coast with snow and ice, caused at least 25 deaths, and left hundreds of thousands without power

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