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California Border Patrol agent kills man

| Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, 9:20 p.m.

SAN DIEGO — A Border Patrol agent fatally shot a man near San Diego when he was struck in the face with a rock, authorities said on Tuesday.

The agent, whose name has been withheld, was attempting to stop a group of people suspected of crossing the border illegally from Mexico. The agent fired at the man who threw the rock.

The man was pronounced dead at the scene. The agent declined to go to a hospital for injuries that a sheriff's lieutenant described as minor.

L.A. archdiocese to pay $13M to settle suits

LOS ANGELES — The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles will pay $13 million to settle 17 clergy abuse lawsuits, including 11 that involve a visiting Mexican priest who fled prosecution and remains a fugitive two decades later.

The deal resolves all remaining clergy abuse lawsuits against the nation's largest archdiocese.

“We're happy to have this behind us,” J. Michael Hennigan, an archdiocese attorney, said on Tuesday.

The archdiocese settled more than 500 cases in 2007 for a record $660 million and has resolved numerous others since.

Kansas

Bill proposed to allow hard spanking

TOPEKA — A Kansas lawmaker is proposing a bill that would allow teachers, caregivers and parents to spank children hard enough to leave marks.

Kansas law allows spanking that doesn't leave marks. State Rep. Gail Finney, a Democrat from Wichita, said she wants to allow up to 10 strikes of the hand and that could leave redness and bruising. The bill would allow parents to give permission to others to spank their children. It would continue to ban hitting a child with fists, in the head or body, or with a belt or switch.

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