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White House announces 1-stop climate website

| Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 8:57 p.m.

WASHINGTON — As part of its campaign to step up efforts to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday announced the development of a website that will serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at various federal agencies.

The initiative to make the information more accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the latest move by the White House to deliver on a pledge that President Obama made in June to use his executive authority to address the causes and effects of climate change in light of congressional inaction on the issue.

In the Obama administration's most high-profile effort, the Environmental Protection Agency in September proposed rules to cut greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants.

NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are spearheading the new Climate Data Initiative, the White House said in a statement.

The beta version of climate.data.gov will provide data sets of sea-level rise and coastal flooding. The White House said the site would eventually provide information about the effects of climate change on the food supply, public health and energy sources.

NOAA, NASA and other federal agencies provide detailed regular reports about long-term climate trends. NOAA routinely distributes short-term seasonal reports for the country that focus on the outlook for extreme weather events.

The Climate Data Initiative aims to host the information in one place where it could be used to create long-term outlooks for towns or regions about the potential effects of climate change, such as the estimates for sea level rises that could affect coastal construction.

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