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Clinton's second term quickly turned to building legacy

AP
FILE - Former president Bill Clinton speaks at a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University, in this March 21, 2014 file photo taken in Tempe, Ariz. The National Archives is scheduled to release thousands of pages of documents from Bill Clinton's administration Friday March 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

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By The Associated Press
Friday, March 28, 2014, 9:39 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — President Clinton's top aides began debating how to build a presidential legacy days after he won re-election in 1996, newly released documents show.

The 2,500 pages of documents released Friday from the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Ark., ranged from drafts of Clinton's speeches to memos exploring ways of dealing with climate change, Republican opponents and the media. It was the third batch of records released since February.

After Bill Clinton won a sweeping re-election against Republican Bob Dole, the White House started working on ways of cementing the president's legacy. The Nov. 24, 1996, memo written by Clinton adviser Gene Sperling urged aides to choose topics carefully and said some approaches might be rejected even if the administration had addressed them successfully.

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