TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

NTSB doesn't find evidence of fire before truck slammed into bus in Calif.

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Sunday, April 13, 2014, 7:18 p.m.
 

RED BLUFF, Calif. — Federal investigators said on Sunday that they haven't found physical evidence confirming a witness' claim that a FedEx truck was on fire before it slammed into a bus carrying high school students, killing 10 people in northern California.

National Transportation Safety Board member Mark Rosekind said investigators are not ruling out a pre-impact fire, but a fire expert did not find evidence of flames as the truck crossed a median, sideswiped a Nissan Altima and crashed into the bus.

“This is all preliminary and factual information,” Rosekind said at a news conference. “We are not ruling anything out.”

The bus was carrying 44 southern California high school students to a free campus tour of Humboldt State University. Many were hoping to become the first in their families to attend college. Five students, three adult chaperones and both drivers died, and dozens were injured in the collision on Thursday in Orland, a small city about 100 miles north of Sacramento.

Bonnie Duran, who drove the Altima and survived with minor injuries, told investigators and reporters on Saturday that she had seen flames emerging from the lower rear of the truck's cab as it approached her car. The bus was gutted, and the truck was a mangled mess when an explosion sent flames towering and black smoke billowing, making it difficult for investigators to track the source of the fire.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Cincy officer indicted on murder charge in fatal shooting of motorist
  2. Mich. high court strikes down mandatory fees for state employees in unions
  3. Calif. oil slick expected to dissipate
  4. University of New Hampshire language guide panned
  5. Clinton to testify before House committee on Benghazi in October
  6. In dispute over coal mine project, two ways of life hang in the balance
  7. Feds accuse Philadelphia congressman Fattah of corruption
  8. House approves bill targeting VA staffers
  9. House skeptical but reserved on Iran deal
  10. Defense memo reveals plan to protect transgender troops
  11. Compromise keeps highway accounts funded