TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Limits on deportations under consideration

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Monday, April 21, 2014, 6:57 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is weighing limiting deportations of immigrants living in the United States illegally who don't have serious criminal records, according to two people with knowledge of his deliberations.

The change, if adopted after an ongoing review ordered by President Obama, could shield tens of thousands of immigrants now removed each year solely because they committed repeat immigration violations, such as re-entering the country illegally after having been deported, failing to comply with a deportation order or missing an immigration court date.

However, it would fall short of the changes sought by activists. They want Obama to expand a two-year-old program that grants work permits to certain immigrants brought here illegally as children to include other groups, such as the parents of any children born in the United States.

John Sandweg, who served until February as acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said he had promoted the policy change for immigrants without serious criminal records before his departure and that it was being weighed by Johnson. An immigration advocate who's discussed the review with the administration confirmed the change was under consideration. The advocate spoke on condition of anonymity because the proceedings are confidential.

“Any report of specific considerations at this time would be premature,” said Clark Stevens, a spokesman for the Homeland Security Department. Stevens said Johnson “has undergone a very rigorous and inclusive process to best inform the review,” including seeking input from people within DHS as well as lawmakers of both parties, and other stakeholders.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Fetal parts in Planned Parenthood lab shown in 4th video
  2. Feds eye use of federal dollars for ads for for-profit colleges
  3. Ex-Cincy cop pleads not guilty, posts bond
  4. Blankenship’s attorneys want mine blast evidence out of trial
  5. Minn. man accused of slaying protected Zimbabwean lion says he thought the trip was legal
  6. Feds accuse Philadelphia congressman Fattah of corruption
  7. Hope dims for Fla. teens lost at sea
  8. New TSA administrator vows training to address security gaps
  9. McClatchy: Emails on Clinton’s private server contain Benghazi information
  10. Minn. dentist laying low in slaying of lion
  11. Christian college in Illinois to stop providing health care over Obamacare