TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Powdered alcohol snagged

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Monday, April 21, 2014, 9:42 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — Don't expect powdered alcohol to hit store shelves anytime soon.

A product called “Palcohol” gained widespread attention online in recent days when it was reported that the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau approved the powdered alcohol, including vodka and rum varieties. A representative for the federal bureau, Tom Hogue, said in an email late Monday that the approvals were issued in error.

In an email message, Palcohol's parent company, Lipsmark, said “there seemed to be a discrepancy on our fill level, how much powder is in the bag.” It said it will resubmit the labels for approval.

According to the website for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, multiple varieties of Palcohol received “label approval” on April 8. Palcohol said in an email that it agreed to surrender the approvals “a few hours ago.”

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is a part of the Treasury Department.

Earlier in the day, Palcohol said in an email that founder Mark Phillips was traveling and unavailable for an interview. It said it wasn't releasing any information on distribution or pricing, and the company's website doesn't provide details on how it makes powdered alcohol.

Robert Lehrman, who runs a beverage law website that initially reported on the product, noted that Palcohol had to have gone through an extensive process before reaching the label approval stage.

“An oversight of this nature does not ring true to me,” Lehrman said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Suspect in killings of wealthy D.C. family arrested
  2. California Congresswoman Sanchez apologizes for Indian whooping-cry caricature
  3. House bill would ease federal fish catch limits
  4. Dogs split from the wolf pack earlier than thought, DNA analysis suggests
  5. 38 Cuban migrants remain on U.S. ship
  6. Prosecutors: Duke Energy could have avoided Dan River spill
  7. Rulings require feds to consider carbon impact of coal mines
  8. Republicans claim enough votes to pass fast-track trade bill
  9. Police release video of person of interest in D.C. slaying
  10. Boehner: Little progress at VA year after Shinseki departure
  11. Senators push for full funding for Amtrak