TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Army officers' careers on the line as cuts loom

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Monday, April 21, 2014, 7:51 p.m.
 

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — After 9/11, tens of thousands of young men and women joined the military, heading for the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and dusty deserts of Iraq.

Many of them now are officers in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, a lot of them are being told they have to leave.

It's painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations at Fort Bragg and Fort Eustis in Virginia, captains talk about their worries after 15-month deployments in which they battled terrorists and saw roadside bombs kill and maim their comrades. They nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through service records before making decisions that could end careers.

During the peak war years, the Army grew to about 570,000, as commanders worked to fill combat brigades and support units to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan. Thousands of newly minted officers moved in during 2006-08.

Already down to about 522,000, the Army must shrink to 490,000 by October 2015, and then to 450,000 two years later. If automatic budget cuts resume, the Army will have to get down to 420,000 — a size service leaders say may not allow them to wage even one major, prolonged military campaign.

While a lot of the reduction can happen from voluntary retirements, resignations and decreased enlistments, Army commanders will have to force as many as 3,000 officers — nearly 10 percent of the planned decrease — to leave by the end of October 2015. Of those, nearly 1,500 are captains, and 550 are majors.

Behind some of those big numbers are soldiers in their late 20s who will be forced out of their military careers long before retirement age and into a struggling job market. They would leave with honorable discharges, but without 20 years in the service they would not be eligible for retirement benefits.

The military has been through this before. In the years after Vietnam and during the 1990s as the Cold War thawed, the Pentagon pushed thousands of service members out the door, leaving what some felt was a hollow military that lacked the soldiers, training and equipment needed to fight and win.

This time, Army leaders argue they're trying to do it right. They're not asking for volunteers, because too many good people leave. So they are combing through files, looking for soldiers with disciplinary or other problems in their annual evaluations — known as efficiency reports — to weed out lower-performing officers.

Col. Trevor Bredenkamp, commander of the 82nd Airborne Division's 1st Brigade Combat Team, said he talked to all of his majors who were in that group, and he had his battalion commanders talk to their captains.

“The challenge is there are about 8 percent that they will have to select that don't have any derogatory information in their file. So there will be some people that will say I don't know why I was selected,” Bredenkamp said. “I'm telling people, hey, they're going to decide who they decide on, and if you've been working hard and doing a good job, by and large, the majority of you don't have to worry about it.”

Once chosen for departure, the young officers will have two months to leave.

“We have an obligation to help them land softly on the outside of the Army,” Bredenkamp said.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Half-ton alligator sets world record
  2. Next hurdle for health care likely tax season
  3. Judge strikes down Texas abortion law
  4. Pilot in F-15 crash was decorated veteran
  5. Odds of ‘megadrought’ in Southwest rises to 50%, study says
  6. Rosa Parks items sell for $4.5M
  7. Legendary ‘Walking Dead’ unit deactivated by Marines
  8. Police: Drugs, alcohol not factors in Freeh crash
  9. McDonnell case heads for jurors
  10. Uzi victim’s family feels sorry for girl, 9, who squeezed trigger
  11. Astronomers get look at birth of huge galaxy
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.