TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Internet Explorer falls prey to bug; Homeland Security suggests not using it

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By USA Today
Monday, April 28, 2014, 7:42 p.m.
 

SAN FRANCISCO — The Department of Homeland Security is advising Americans not to use the Internet Explorer browser until a fix is found for a serious security flaw that was brought to light during the weekend.

The bug was announced on Saturday by FireEye Research Labs, an Internet security software company based in Milpitas, Calif.

“We are unaware of a practical solution to this problem,” the Department of Homeland Security's United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team said in a post.

It recommended that users and administrators “consider employing an alternative Web browser until an official update is available.”

Because the hack uses a corrupted Adobe Flash file to attack the victim's computer, users can avoid it by turning off Adobe Flash.

“The attack will not work without Adobe Flash,” FireEye said. “Disabling the Flash plugin within IE will prevent the exploit from functioning.”

FireEye said that the hackers exploiting the bug are calling their campaign “Operational Clandestine Fox.”

Microsoft confirmed that it is working to fix the code that allows Internet Explorer versions six through 11 to be exploited by the vulnerability. As of Monday, no fix had been posted.

About 55 percent of PCs run one of those versions of Internet Explorer, according to the technology research firm NetMarketShare.

The bug works by using Adobe Flash to attack a computer's memory.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Buffalo weighs public boarding school proposals for at-risk kids
  2. Police protesters tangle with baseball fans in Baltimore
  3. Internal NBC News inquiry finds 11 fibs by anchorman Williams
  4. Study a surprise: Commercial bees unfazed by pesticides
  5. GOP presidential candidates decry potential nuke deal with Iran to Republican Jewish Coalition
  6. Police protesters tangle with baseball fans in Baltimore
  7. Federal highway fund shortage batters states
  8. AG misled Congress on spying dispute, Bush-era report says
  9. Magma chamber spied under Yellowstone volcano
  10. Minnesota Somali men foiled in plot to join terrorists in Syria
  11. Oregon mulls law limiting antibiotic use on livestock