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$119M smartphone patent award from Samsung falls short for Apple

| Saturday, May 3, 2014, 7:39 p.m.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — A California jury late Friday awarded Apple $119 million — far less than it demanded — in a patent battle with Samsung over alleged copying of smartphone features, and the jury made the victory even smaller by finding that Apple illegally used one of Samsung's patents.

The verdict was a far cry from the $2.2 billion Apple sought and the $930 million it won in a 2012 trial making similar patent infringement claims against older Samsung products, most of which are no longer for sale in the United States.

The jury found that Apple had infringed on one of Samsung's patents in making the iPhone 4 and 5. Jurors awarded Samsung $158,400, trimming that amount from the original $119.62 million verdict. Samsung had sought $6 million.

“Though this verdict is large by normal standards, it is hard to view this outcome as much of a victory for Apple,” Santa Clara University law professor Brian Love said. “This amount is less than 10 percent of the amount Apple requested and probably doesn't surpass by too much the amount Apple spent litigating this case.”

The award may be adjusted slightly in favor of Apple. Jurors were ordered to return to court on Monday to continue deliberations on a minor matter that could result in a higher award for Apple. Because the jury is still empaneled, jurors were prevented from talking publicly about the case.

Samsung spokesman Lauren Restuccia declined to comment, but Apple declared victory.

“Samsung willfully stole our ideas and copied our products,” Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet said. “We are fighting to defend the hard work that goes into beloved products like the iPhone, which our employees devote their lives to designing and delivering for our customers.”

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