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4 bodies found in burned mansion in Florida

| Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 9:36 p.m.

TAMPA — The fire at a Florida mansion belonging to a former tennis star was intentionally set and four bodies were found in the charred remains, police said Wednesday.

The victims were described as two adults and two teenagers, Hillsborough County Sheriff's Col. Donna Lusczynski said. She described the fire as unusual and said there were “various fireworks” throughout the Tampa Bay-area home.

Two of the victims appeared to have suffered from upper-body trauma, but Lusczynski didn't indicate which ones or give any more details. She said no weapons had been found and that murder-suicide was a possibility.

The teens' bodies were found in their respective bedrooms and the two adults were found in one bedroom, she said.

Former tennis standout James Blake had rented the home to a family for the past two years, and was not there at the time, Lusczynski said. She identified the renters as the Campbell family; voter registration records identified them as Darrin Campbell and his wife, Kimberly.

A former neighbor, George Connley, said Darrin Campbell was the treasurer of Carrollwood Day School, a private school attended by the Campbell's teenage children, Colin and Megan.

The Campbells were unaccounted for, but Luscyznski would not say if authorities believed the bodies in the house to be theirs. She said the remains have not been positively identified yet.

At one time, Darrin Campbell was the senior vice president at PODS, a company that provides mobile, temporary shipping and storage containers. According to his LinkedIn profile, he left PODS in 2007 and was a vice president at IVANS, an insurance company.

IVANS was bought by another company and Campbell no longer worked there, said Matt Fogt, a spokesman for the new company, Applied Systems, who was reached by telephone.

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