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NAACP's new leader an 'heir' of decision in landmark Brown v. Board of Education

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CORRECTS MIDDLE NAME TO WILLIAM - In this image provided by the NAACP, Roslyn Brock, right, chairman of the national board of directors for the NAACP, puts a NAACP pin on new national president and CEO, Cornell William Brooks on Saturday, May 17, 2014, in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. The selection of Brooks came as the United States marked the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, which outlawed segregation in public schools. The lawsuit was argued by the organization's legal arm. (AP Photo/NAACP, J. Adams)

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, May 17, 2014, 7:06 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — As a Head Start and Yale Law School graduate, Cornell William Brooks calls himself a direct beneficiary of Brown v. Board of Education.

Now the lawyer and activist is taking over as the next national president and CEO of the NAACP, whose legal arm brought that landmark case challenging segregation in public schools.

On the 60th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision that said separating black and white children was unconstitutional, the nation's oldest civil rights organization announced Brooks' selection.

The NAACP's board made the final decision on Friday night, and chair Roslyn Brock told The Associated Press about Brooks' new position on Saturday morning.

Brooks will be formally presented to the Baltimore-based organization's members at its national convention in Las Vegas in July.

“I am a beneficiary, an heir and a grandson, if you will, of Brown versus Board of Education,” Brooks said.

“My life is the direct product, if you will, of the legacy of the blood, sweat and tears of the NAACP and so today I'm particularly mindful that the NAACP has made America what it is, and certainly made my life possible and we are all grateful heirs of that legacy.”

Brooks, 53, of Annandale, N.J., will become the NAACP's 18th national president, replacing interim leader Lorraine Miller. Miller has served in that position since Benjamin Jealous ended his five-year tenure last year.

“I am deeply humbled and honored to be entrusted with the opportunity to lead this powerful historic organization,” Brooks said in an interview. “In our fight to ensure voting rights, economic equality, health equity, and ending racial discrimination for all people, there is indeed much work to be done.”

Brooks, a minister, is originally from Georgetown, S.C. He is president and CEO of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice, a Newark-based urban research and advocacy organization.

He graduated from Jackson State University, received a Master of Divinity from Boston University School of Theology and got his law degree from Yale.

Brooks has worked as a lawyer for the Federal Communication Commission and the Justice Department. He ran for Congress as a Democrat in Virginia in 1998. He still owns a home in Woodbridge, Va.

“Mr. Brooks is a pioneering lawyer and civil rights leader who brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the association,” Brock said. “We look forward to leveraging his legal prowess, vision and leadership as we tackle the pressing civil rights issues of the 21st century.”

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