Share This Page

Nebraska caught up in similar online scam from Russian's malware

| Monday, June 2, 2014, 11:24 p.m.

Federal officials in Nebraska have charged a Russian mastermind with running online scams similar to the ones named in complaints filed in Pittsburgh, according to documents unsealed on Monday.

In the criminal complaint filed in Nebraska, officials said Evgeniy Mikhaylovich Bogachev used the alias “Lucky12345” to create malware to steal from more than two-dozen named banks and businesses.

Bogachev is accused in the indictment of working with eight co-conspirators in Russia, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. The two in the United Kingdom are in custody; the others remain at large. Named as co-conspirators in the Nebraska indictment:

• Vyacheslav Igorevich Penchukov of Ukraine used the online name “tank” and coordinated the exchange of stolen banking credentials and “money mules”;

• Ivan Viktorvich Klepikov of Ukraine used the name “ptr0vich” and was a systems administrator who handled the technical aspects of the criminal scheme;

• Alexey Dmitrievich Bron of Ukraine used the name “thehead” and was the financial manager;

• Alexey Tikonov of Russia used the name “kusanagi” and was a coder or developer;

• Yevhen Kulibaba of the United Kingdom used the name “jonni” and moved stolen money (in custody);

• Yuriy Konovalenko of the United Kingdom used the name “jtk0” and moved stolen money (in custody);

• A Russian hacker who used the name “AQUA” moved stolen money; and,

• A Ukrainian hacker named “MRICQ” was a coder who developed codes to compromise the banking system.

Related Content
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.