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Study: Denying anti-depressants for teens, young adults raises risk of suicides

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By The Washington Post
Thursday, June 19, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Government warnings a decade ago about the risks associated with children and adolescents taking anti-depressants, such as Paxil and Zoloft, appear to have backfired — causing an increase in suicide attempts and discouraging many depressed young people from seeking treatment, according to a study published on Wednesday.

Because of FDA warnings about SSRIs ­— selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors — anti-depressant prescriptions fell sharply for adolescents ages 10 to 17 and for young adults ages 18 to 29. At the same time, researchers found that the number of suicide attempts rose by more than 20 percent in adolescents and by more than a third in young adults.

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