| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Study: Denying anti-depressants for teens, young adults raises risk of suicides

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Thursday, June 19, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Government warnings a decade ago about the risks associated with children and adolescents taking anti-depressants, such as Paxil and Zoloft, appear to have backfired — causing an increase in suicide attempts and discouraging many depressed young people from seeking treatment, according to a study published on Wednesday.

Because of FDA warnings about SSRIs ­— selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors — anti-depressant prescriptions fell sharply for adolescents ages 10 to 17 and for young adults ages 18 to 29. At the same time, researchers found that the number of suicide attempts rose by more than 20 percent in adolescents and by more than a third in young adults.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Police officer killed in Colorado Spring clinic rampage a co-pastor, figure skater
  2. Colorado clinic shooting suspect talked of baby parts, police say
  3. Slow-moving, wintry storm packs punch in Plains, Midwest
  4. Federal $1.1 trillion spending bill loaded with policy deals
  5. Kids making oral history with StoryCorps holiday project
  6. Disability claim waits grow alongside swelling caseloads for judges
  7. Pot doctors in medical marijuana states push boundaries with marketing
  8. Prof proposes museum of corruption in New York capital
  9. AIDS activist finishes rowing across Atlantic
  10. Authorization for NSA dragnets of phone call data expires
  11. Police union stands by Chicago officer charged with murdering teen