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UCLA says $300,000 speaking fee paid Hillary Clinton came from private endowment

AP
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets customers at a Little Rock, Ark., Wal-Mart store as she signs copies of her book 'Hard Choices' Friday, June 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)

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By The Washington Post
Sunday, June 29, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton was paid $300,000 to speak to students and faculty at the University of California at Los Angeles in March, the university said on Friday.

UCLA spokesman Jean-Paul Renaud said Clinton's fee was paid through a private endowment established for a lecture series by Meyer Luskin, an investor and president of Scope Industries, a food waste recycling company.

In 2012, former President Bill Clinton was paid $250,000 to deliver the inaugural address in the Luskin lecture series, Renaud said.

In both instances, Renaud said, the fees went to the Clintons' charitable group, now called the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

UCLA is a public university, but Renaud said the fees “came from private money. No public funds were used for it — no tuition dollars, no state funds.” News of Hillary Clinton's UCLA payment, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, arrives amid growing scrutiny of Clinton's personal wealth and speaking fees.

Clinton is being paid $225,000 to speak at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. Although her office said she is directing the funds to the Clinton Foundation, her pay has drawn protests from student leaders. Jon Ralston, an influential television journalist in Nevada, called Clinton's fee “grotesque” and “obscene.”

A spokesman for Clinton did not respond to a request for comment.

On Friday, The Washington Post published a comprehensive review of Bill Clinton's paid speeches. He has earned $104.9 million delivering 542 speeches around the world from the time he left the White House in January 2001 until Hillary Clinton's departure as secretary of state in January 2013, the Post review found.

Most of the money — $56.3 million — came from speeches that Clinton delivered to companies and groups overseas, according to the review.

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