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Prostitute suspected in 2nd death

| Thursday, July 10, 2014, 9:06 p.m.

MILTON, Ga. — Two months before police say a high-priced prostitute calmly left a Google executive dying from a heroin overdose on his yacht, the woman panicked on the phone with a 911 dispatcher as her boyfriend lay on the floor of their home in the throes of a fatal overdose.

Police said on Thursday they are re-examining the death of Dean Riopelle, 53, the owner of a popular Atlanta music venue. Riopelle had been dating Alix Tichelman, 26, who is charged with manslaughter in the November death of Google executive Forrest Hayes. She was never charged in Riopelle's death.

“Both subjects in these cases died of heroin overdoses, so there's just several factors we want to look at to make sure that we didn't miss anything,” Milton police Capt. Shawn McCarty said.

It is not clear how long Tichelman may have been involved in prostitution, though police in California say she had many clients in the wealthy Silicon Valley. Police there also said that, after Hayes' death, she had done online searches for how to defend herself legally after administering a lethal dose of heroin.

Numerous social media postings, photos and other articles online suggest she was pursuing a career as a fetish model and a life with Riopelle — one photo posted on her Facebook page shows her displaying a diamond “promise ring” given to her by Riopelle.

Riopelle and Tichelman had been dating for about two and a half years and lived together, said Riopelle's sister, Dee Riopelle.

In a 2012 interview with a fetish magazine, fIXE, under the pseudonym AK Kennedy, Tichelman describes herself as a model, writer and makeup artist.

One post on her Facebook page, titled simply “heroin,” is a poem that opens with the line: “this private downward spiral-this suffocating blackhole.”

She also said she was interested in bondage, dominance, sadism and masochism, or BDSM. She said she and Riopelle would go to clubs, with her wearing a collar and leash.

Riopelle was the lead singer of a rock ‘n' roll band called the Impotent Sea Snakes, known for its wild stage shows and sexually explicit lyrics. Online videos show the band performing at a music festival in Germany, with members dressed in drag.

Back in Georgia, Riopelle also was known for owning the Masquerade, a popular Atlanta music venue that is a popular destination for rock, punk and metal acts. Housed in a former mill, the venue is composed of three levels: “heaven” upstairs; “purgatory” on the main floor; and “hell” downstairs.

Over the years, he opened several sports bars and a fetish bar, his sister said.

“He was very, very wise when it came to business sense,” Dee Riopelle said. “Everything Dean touched turned to gold.”

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