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Biden decries voting restrictions in NAACP address

| Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 5:54 p.m.
Vice President Joe Biden, right, shakes hands with NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks at the NAACP annual convention Wednesday, July 23, 2014, in Las Vegas. Biden called on members of the NAACP to spread the word about what he called 'a hailstorm' of measures to restrict citizens’ ability to vote, trying to rally the Democratic Party’s base before the midterm elections. (AP Photo/John Locher)(AP Photo/John Locher)

LAS VEGAS — Vice President Joe Biden urged the NAACP on Wednesday to spread the word about what he called “a hailstorm” of measures to restrict citizens' ability to vote, trying to rally the Democratic Party's base before the midterm elections.

In a 31-minute speech to the civil rights group's annual convention in Las Vegas, Biden said there have been 83 attempts this year alone in 29 states to restrict voting rights. The measures stiffen requirements on identification needed to vote, or limit or end early voting.

“These moves to limit the right to vote are nothing more than pure politics, masquerading as attempts to combat corruption where there is none,” Biden said.

Civil rights groups complain the measures make it harder for minorities to vote because they have less access to identification and depend more on early voting.

Biden said that if the laws had been in effect during the 2012 election and only 6 percent of black voters who cast their ballots had been unable to vote, President Obama would have lost Florida rather than narrowly winning the state.

Biden criticized the Republican justices on the Supreme Court who last year softened a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, noting the measure had strong bipartisan support for decades. He said that after former segregationist Strom Thurmond voted to reauthorize the measure in the 1980s and Republicans continued to support the law, “I thought we had finally won.”

Biden's speech was part of a swing through liberal political gatherings by the vice president, who has been eclipsed by Hillary Clinton as Democrats jockey for position in 2016. He was to attend a rally for a Nevada congressional candidate on Wednesday afternoon and speak to the National Urban League in Ohio on Thursday.

The emphasis on voting rights is an effort to motivate minority voters who are more likely to sit out midterm elections such as the one in November. Blacks voted at a greater rate than whites for the first time in history in 2012, and some observers believe the efforts to restrict voting access backfired and increased black voter turnout.

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