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Man told transit police the Boston Marathon bomber 'was my best friend'

| Wednesday, July 23, 2014, 8:03 p.m.
This Nov. 21, 2013 Massachusetts Bay Transit Police booking photo released Wednesday, July 23, 2014 by the Dorchester District Court in Boston shows Stephen Sergio Silva, after he was arrested and charged with selling marijuana at a Boston train station. Silva was arrested Monday, July 21, 2014 on federal charges of heroin trafficking and possession of a handgun with an obliterated serial number. The same gun was used to kill MIT police Officer Sean Collier during a manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, according to two people with knowledge of the case who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Massachusetts Bay Transit Police)

BOSTON — A man linked to a gun used to kill a university police officer days after the Boston Marathon bombings told police he smoked marijuana every day because, in his words, “my best friend was the bomber,” according to court documents.

Stephen Silva was arrested Monday on charges of heroin trafficking and possession of a handgun with an obliterated serial number. The same gun was used to kill MIT police Officer Sean Collier during a manhunt for the bombing suspects, according to two people with knowledge of the case who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the investigation.

Silva, 21, was a high school classmate and a close friend of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 260. Collier, 26, was ambushed several days later and shot multiple times in his car.

Silva was arrested on marijuana charges at a train station in Boston's Dorchester neighborhood in November. According to court documents, after transit police found two bags of marijuana and a wad of $555 in cash in Silva's pockets, he repeatedly told them, “I smoke a lot of weed every day because my best friend was the bomber.”

Jonathan Shapiro, an attorney for Stephen Silva (pronounced STEF'-an) did not immediately return a call seeking comment Wednesday. On Tuesday, after Silva made his initial appearance in court, Shapiro said he had received the case only a few hours earlier.

Shapiro said in a statement that he was in the process of meeting with his client and reviewing evidence in the case.

According to the indictment, Silva received the gun in or around February 2013.

Silva was ordered to remain in custody, and a bail hearing was scheduled for Aug. 6.

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