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House panel votes to sue Obama over health law implementation

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, July 24, 2014, 5:30 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Over Democratic objections, Republicans cleared the way on Thursday for a House vote on legislation authorizing an election-year lawsuit accusing President Obama of failing to implement the 4-year-old health care law as written.

The vote in the Rules Committee was 7-4, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed.

Republicans claim Obama is exceeding his authority by failing to carry out legislation that Congress passed and he signed into law.

Democrats counter that the suit is a political maneuver to improve Republican prospects in the November elections.

Democrats conceded that majority Republicans have enough votes to prevail when the measure comes to a vote in the next few days.

Republicans have long claimed that Obama has selectively enforced the health care law, pointing to a series of executive orders he has issued since its enactment. The administration disputes that view.

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