TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Gay rights groups dispute federal survey's low estimate of population

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Gay rights activists are distressed over the results of the first large-scale federal survey measuring sexual orientation in the United States, which last month reported that less than 3 percent of the population identifies as gay, lesbian or bisexual.

They contend it is a gross undercount and are particularly upset because they worked for years to get sexual orientation added to the 57-year-old National Health Interview Survey, the government's premiere measure of Americans' health status and behaviors.

“The truth is numbers matter, and political influence matters,” said Scout, director of the nonprofit CenterLink Network of LGBT Equity, who goes by only one name.

Scout and others believe the survey, which is administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is flawed. They point to other surveys, including some scholarly papers and less prominent government studies, that peg the number at closer to 4 percent.

Socially conservative groups seized on the news. The survey “confirms what we already knew, that only 1 to 3 percent of the population identifies as gay, lesbian or bisexual,” Jeff Johnston, issues analyst with Focus on the Family, a Christian nonprofit based in Colorado Springs that opposes gay rights, said in a statement.

“What's interesting is comparing that number with public perception,” he added. “The average person thinks the percentage is much higher, probably because of the high profile that entertainment, news media and other influential sources have given homosexuality in recent years.”

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Man caught jumping White House fence
  2. Coburn’s final ‘Wastebook’ tallies $25B in what he considers ‘pork’
  3. Security at Capitol questioned
  4. 8 arrested in post-game riots in Morgantown
  5. Personal use of Secret Service agents on staffer’s behalf draws investigaton
  6. Social Security recipients to get increase in benefits
  7. Coast Guard to seek billions to protect Arctic interests
  8. Academic scandal at University of North Carolina bigger than previously reported
  9. 4 private security guards convicted
  10. If nurses in safety gear got Ebola ...
  11. Ferguson slaying of Brown reconstructed in county autopsy
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.