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U.S. doctor stricken with Ebola improving

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By Reuters
Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014, 8:00 p.m.
 

ATLANTA — An American doctor stricken with the deadly Ebola virus while in Liberia and brought to the United States for treatment in a special isolation ward is improving, the top health official said on Sunday.

Dr. Kent Brantly was able to walk, with help, from an ambulance after he was flown on Saturday to Atlanta, where he is being treated by infectious disease specialists at Emory University Hospital.

“It's encouraging that he seems to be improving — that's really important — and we're hoping he'll continue to improve,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Frieden told CBS' “Face the Nation” it was too soon to predict whether Brantly will survive, and a hospital spokesman said Emory did not expect to provide any updates on the doctor's condition on Sunday.

A second U.S. aid worker who contracted Ebola alongside Brantly, missionary Nancy Writebol, will be brought to the United States on a flight because the medical aircraft is equipped to carry one patient at a time.

Writebol, a 59-year-old mother of two who worked to decontaminate those entering and leaving an Ebola isolation unit in Liberia, was due to depart for the United States overnight on Monday, Liberia's information minister said.

The Americans will be treated primarily by four infectious disease physicians and will be able to see relatives through a plate-glass window and speak to them by phone or intercom.

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