TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Nearly 10 million Americans changed race, census says

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, 8:03 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Nearly 10 million Americans decided they would be a different race or ethnicity in the early 2000s, with the largest movement coming from Hispanics deciding which racial category they should be in, a census report showed on Wednesday.

People switched between races, moved from multiple races to a single race or back, or decided to add or drop Hispanic ethnicity from their identifiers on census forms.

Researchers said the data used — race, ethnicity, sex, age, location and how the information was gathered — is not particularly helpful for figuring out why people decided to make those changes. They noted that there has been a tendency toward multiple-race responses, and new census form designs may have caused changes in how people respond to questions about Hispanic ethnicity.

Age may have something to do with the changes, the researchers suggested.

“Compared to adults, children and adolescents may be more likely to change their race/Hispanic responses for two reasons: childhood and adolescence are times of personal identity development, and young people's information was probably reported by their parents in 2000 but may be self-reported in 2010,” researchers said.

The report showed that 1 in 16 people — or approximately 9.8 million of 162 million — who responded to both the 2000 and 2010 censuses gave different answers when it came to race and ethnicity.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Marines finally ready to roll out controversial fighter jet
  2. 4 dead, 65 sickened in Bronx by Legionella
  3. Food industry players fighting proposed dietary guidelines drop millions on lobbyists
  4. Name of cop withheld in shooting of motorist in South Carolina
  5. Obama’s nuclear deal lobbying sways Democrats
  6. Florida panther population cut by 10 percent in 7 months
  7. U.S., Hong Kong researchers develop computer model to examine spread of influenza
  8. Midwest farmers pessimistic of fall harvest amid damaging, long-term rain
  9. Bee vaccination study gives insight, could aid food production
  10. Studying reflexes of sea snail sheds light on human memory loss
  11. State Department accuses top Clinton aide of violations