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DEA improperly paid $854,460 for passenger lists

| Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, 9:06 p.m.

WASHINGTON — The Drug Enforcement Administration paid an Amtrak secretary $854,460 over nearly 20 years to obtain confidential information about train passengers, though the DEA could have lawfully obtained it for free through a law enforcement network, The Associated Press has learned.

The employee was not publicly identified except as a “secretary to a train and engine crew” in a report on the incident by Amtrak's inspector general. The secretary was allowed to retire rather than undergo administrative discipline once the discovery that the employee had effectively been acting as an informant who “regularly” sold private passenger information since 1995 without Amtrak's approval, according to a one-paragraph summary of the matter.

On Monday, the office of Amtrak Inspector General Tom Howard declined to identify the secretary or say why it took so long to uncover the payments. Howard's report on the incident concluded, “We suggested policy changes and other measures to address control weaknesses that Amtrak management is considering.”

Passenger name reservation information is collected by airlines, rail carriers and others and generally includes a passenger's name, the names of other passengers traveling with them, the dates of the ticket and travel, frequent flier or rider information, credit card numbers, emergency contact information, travel itinerary, baggage information, passport number, date of birth, gender and seat number.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, the senior Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, called the $854,460 an unnecessary expense and asked for further information about the incident in a letter he released on Monday to DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart. Grassley said the incident “raises some serious questions about the DEA's practices and damages its credibility to cooperate with other law enforcement agencies.”

Under a joint drug enforcement task force that includes the DEA and Amtrak's own police agency, the task force can obtain Amtrak confidential passenger reservation information at no cost, the inspector general's report said.

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