TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

DEA improperly paid $854,460 for passenger lists

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, 9:06 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — The Drug Enforcement Administration paid an Amtrak secretary $854,460 over nearly 20 years to obtain confidential information about train passengers, though the DEA could have lawfully obtained it for free through a law enforcement network, The Associated Press has learned.

The employee was not publicly identified except as a “secretary to a train and engine crew” in a report on the incident by Amtrak's inspector general. The secretary was allowed to retire rather than undergo administrative discipline once the discovery that the employee had effectively been acting as an informant who “regularly” sold private passenger information since 1995 without Amtrak's approval, according to a one-paragraph summary of the matter.

On Monday, the office of Amtrak Inspector General Tom Howard declined to identify the secretary or say why it took so long to uncover the payments. Howard's report on the incident concluded, “We suggested policy changes and other measures to address control weaknesses that Amtrak management is considering.”

Passenger name reservation information is collected by airlines, rail carriers and others and generally includes a passenger's name, the names of other passengers traveling with them, the dates of the ticket and travel, frequent flier or rider information, credit card numbers, emergency contact information, travel itinerary, baggage information, passport number, date of birth, gender and seat number.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, the senior Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, called the $854,460 an unnecessary expense and asked for further information about the incident in a letter he released on Monday to DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart. Grassley said the incident “raises some serious questions about the DEA's practices and damages its credibility to cooperate with other law enforcement agencies.”

Under a joint drug enforcement task force that includes the DEA and Amtrak's own police agency, the task force can obtain Amtrak confidential passenger reservation information at no cost, the inspector general's report said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. New Orleans slow to heal 10 years after Hurricane Katrina
  2. Deputy fatally shot from behind at Houston gas station
  3. Gas boom brings successes, struggles to W.Va. communities
  4. Clinton: Women ‘expect’ extremism from terrorists, not GOP candidates
  5. Long Island college student arrested for trying to record police, civil liberties experts say
  6. Kraft Heinz recalls more than 2M pounds of turkey bacon
  7. Prep school graduate Labrie convicted of sex charges
  8. Parsing of Clinton email data not ‘black-and-white’
  9. Mobile forensics lab used in search of Subway pitchman Fogle’s Indiana home
  10. Dow, S&P, Nasdaq soar 4% despite China worries, but volatility expected to endure
  11. Planned Parenthood alleges ‘smear’ campaign in letter to top lawmakers