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Witnesses: Mo. man had hands raised when he was shot

| Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, 9:15 p.m.

FERGUSON, Mo. — The hands of a black man who was fatally shot by a police officer were raised when the officer approached with his weapon drawn and fired repeatedly, according to two men who said they witnessed the shooting that sparked a night of unrest in suburban St. Louis.

The FBI opened an investigation on Monday into the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who police said was shot multiple times on Saturday during a confrontation with an officer in Ferguson, a suburb of 21,000 that's nearly 70 percent black.

Authorities were vague about exactly what led the officer to open fire, except to say that the shooting was preceded by a scuffle. It was unclear whether Brown or a man he was with was involved in the altercation.

Investigators have refused to publicly disclose the race of the officer, who is on administrative leave. But Phillip Walker said he was on the porch of an apartment complex overlooking the scene when he heard a shot and saw a white officer with Brown on the street.

Brown “was giving up in the sense of raising his arms and being subdued,” Walker said.

The family had planned to drop their son off at a technical college on Monday to begin his studies.

“Instead of celebrating his future, they are having to plan his funeral,” said Benjamin Crump, a family attorney who represented Trayvon Martin's relatives after he was slain in 2012 in Florida.

“I don't want to sugarcoat it,” Crump added. Brown “was executed in broad daylight.”

The FBI is looking into possible civil rights violations, said Cheryl Mimura, a spokeswoman for the agency's St. Louis field office.

Attorney General Eric Holder said the case deserves a full review.

Nearly three dozen people were arrested when a candlelight vigil Sunday night was followed by crowds looting and burning stores, vandalizing vehicles, assaulting and threatening reporters and taunting officers.

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