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Ferguson sued over police actions amid riots

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, 9:09 p.m.
 

ST. LOUIS — A federal lawsuit filed on Thursday alleges that police in Ferguson and St. Louis County used excessive force and falsely arrested innocent bystanders amid attempts to quell widespread unrest since the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

The five plaintiffs in the suit in St. Louis include a clinical social worker, who said she and her 17-year-old son were roughed up and arrested for not evacuating a McDonald's quickly enough. Another plaintiff said he was shot multiple times with rubber bullets and was called racial slurs by police while walking through the protest zone to his mother's home. A third plaintiff said he was arrested for filming the disturbances.

“The police were completely out of control,” said attorney Malik Shabazz of Black Lawyers for Justice, a group whose members sought to quell tensions at the nightly protests that stretched for more than a week after Ferguson Officer Darren Wilson, who is white, shot the unarmed Brown, who is black.

“In those initial days, it was virtually a police riot,” Shabazz said.

The lawsuit seeks $40 million in damages. It names Ferguson police Chief Thomas Jackson; St. Louis County police Chief Jon Belmar; Ferguson Officer Justin Cosma; and several unnamed officers identified collectively as John Doe. The lawsuit includes the city of Ferguson and St. Louis County.

Shabazz said the suit could be broadened to include additional plaintiffs. A St. Louis County police spokesman referred inquiries to county Counselor Patricia Redington, who said she hadn't seen the suit and declined to comment.

In the immediate days after Brown's shooting, local police in riot gear fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters who refused to disperse. Some demonstrators broke into nearby stores. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon eventually placed the State Highway Patrol in charge of securing Ferguson with a more relaxed approach. Nixon later imposed a curfew that was lifted after several nights of clashes between police and protesters. Nixon called in the National Guard, whose members have departed Ferguson.

Plaintiff Tracey White said she and her son, a high school junior, were waiting for a ride from her husband at a West Florissant Avenue McDonald's after attending an Aug. 13 “peace and love” rally at a Ferguson church when several rifle-carrying officers told her she was being arrested because she would not “shut up.” White said she and her son were detained for five hours at the county jail on charges of failing to disperse, but she said she was not provided with any records reflecting that charge or a future court date.

“It was so horrifying,” she said. “We did nothing wrong.”

 

 
 


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