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Thousands march through Boston week after Virginia bloodshed

| Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, 12:15 p.m.
Counterprotesters hold signs and chant at the Statehouse before a planned 'Free Speech' rally by conservative organizers begin on the adjacent Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.  Police Commissioner William Evans said Friday that 500 officers, some in uniform, others undercover, would be deployed to keep the two groups apart.
Counterprotesters hold signs and chant at the Statehouse before a planned 'Free Speech' rally by conservative organizers begin on the adjacent Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston. Police Commissioner William Evans said Friday that 500 officers, some in uniform, others undercover, would be deployed to keep the two groups apart.
State and city police inspect people arriving for a 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston. The permit for the rally came with severe restrictions, including a ban on backpacks, sticks and anything that could be used as a weapon.
State and city police inspect people arriving for a 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston. The permit for the rally came with severe restrictions, including a ban on backpacks, sticks and anything that could be used as a weapon.
Counterprotesters assemble at the Statehouse before a planned 'Free Speech' rally by conservative organizers begins on the adjacent Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters assemble at the Statehouse before a planned 'Free Speech' rally by conservative organizers begins on the adjacent Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Former Boston Celtics star Cedric Maxwell stands on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston. Maxwell, a current member of the Celtics radio broadcast crew, said he plans to participate in the counterprotest to the midday 'Free Speech' rally that organizers planned to hold on the Common.
Former Boston Celtics star Cedric Maxwell stands on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston. Maxwell, a current member of the Celtics radio broadcast crew, said he plans to participate in the counterprotest to the midday 'Free Speech' rally that organizers planned to hold on the Common.
Counterprotesters wait for the start of a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters wait for the start of a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters, rear, listen to a conservative activist, right, before a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters, rear, listen to a conservative activist, right, before a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters hold signs before conservative organizers begin a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.
Counterprotesters hold signs before conservative organizers begin a planned 'Free Speech' rally on Boston Common, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, in Boston.

BOSTON — Thousands of leftist counterprotesters marched peaceably through downtown Boston on Saturday, chanting anti-Nazi slogans and waving signs condemning white nationalism ahead of a rally being staged by conservative activists a week after a Virginia demonstration turned deadly.

Police Commissioner William Evans said Friday that 500 officers — some in uniform, others undercover — were deployed to keep the two groups apart Saturday. Boston's Democratic mayor, Marty Walsh, and Massachusetts' Republican governor, Charlie Baker, both warned that extremist unrest wouldn't be tolerated in this city famed as the cradle of American liberty.

Organizers of the midday event, billed as a “Free Speech Rally,” have publicly distanced themselves from the neo-Nazis, white supremacists and others who fomented violence in Charlottesville on Aug. 12. A woman was killed at that Unite the Right rally, and scores of others were injured, when a car plowed into counterdemonstrators.

But opponents feared that white nationalists might show up in Boston anyway, raising the specter of ugly confrontations in the first potentially large and racially charged gathering in a major U.S. city since Charlottesville.

Events are planned around the country, in cities including Atlanta, Dallas and New Orleans.

Walsh greeted counterprotesters Saturday morning outside Reggie Lewis Center in the city's Roxbury neighborhood. Counterprotesters from Black Lives Matter and other groups denouncing racism and anti-Semitism marching from there to the Common, and another group plans to rally on the steps of the Statehouse overlooking the sprawling park.

Some counterprotesters dressed entirely in black and wore bandannas over their faces. They chanted anti-Nazi and anti-fascism slogans, and waved signs that said: “Love your neighbor,” “Resist fascism” and “Hate never made U.S. great.”

Boston police estimated the size of the crowd participating in the march to the Common at about 15,000.

The permit issued for the rally on Boston Common came with severe restrictions, including a ban on backpacks, sticks and anything that could be used as a weapon. The permit is for 100 people, though an organizer has said he expected up to 1,000 people to attend.

The Boston Free Speech Coalition, which organized the event, said it has nothing to do with white nationalism or racism and its group is not affiliated with the Charlottesville rally organizers in any way.

“We are strictly about free speech,” the group said on its Facebook page. “... we will not be offering our platform to racism or bigotry. We denounce the politics of supremacy and violence.”

But the mayor pointed out that some of those invited to speak “spew hate.” Kyle Chapman, who described himself on Facebook as a “proud American nationalist,” said he will attend.

Black Lives Matter said Friday that members from around the U.S. planned to march Saturday in Boston.

Walsh said the city would do whatever is necessary to head off violence initiated by either side. “If anyone gets out of control — at all — it will be shut down,” he said.

“We will not tolerate any misbehavior, violence or vandalism whatsoever,” said Evans, Boston's top cop.

Dating to 1634, Boston Common is the nation's oldest city park. The leafy downtown park is popular with locals and tourists and has been the scene of numerous rallies and protests for centuries.

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