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Solar eclipse views from across the United States

| Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, 11:00 a.m.
Solar prominences become visible as the eclipse reaches totality as seen from Clarksville, Tenn., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Solar prominences become visible as the eclipse reaches totality as seen from Clarksville, Tenn., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
The moon partially covers the sun after a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore.
The moon partially covers the sun after a total eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Redmond, Ore.
The International Space Station is seen in silhouette as it transits the sun during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Banner, Wyo.
The International Space Station is seen in silhouette as it transits the sun during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Banner, Wyo.
A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.
A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.
The moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, in Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
The moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, in Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
This NASA handout photo shows the sun as it rises behind Jack Mountain head of the solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 in Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.
AFP PHOTO/BILL INGALLS/NASA/HANDOUT
This NASA handout photo shows the sun as it rises behind Jack Mountain head of the solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 in Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.
Mike Newchurch, left, professor of atmospheric chemistry at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and graduate student Paula Tucker prepare a weather balloon before releasing it to perform research during the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.
Mike Newchurch, left, professor of atmospheric chemistry at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and graduate student Paula Tucker prepare a weather balloon before releasing it to perform research during the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.
CARBONDALE , IL - AUGUST 20:  Campers, in town to view the solar eclipse, relax at their indoor campsites on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Four hundred campers paid $40-per-night to camp in the gymnasium. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Getty Images
CARBONDALE , IL - AUGUST 20: Campers, in town to view the solar eclipse, relax at their indoor campsites on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Four hundred campers paid $40-per-night to camp in the gymnasium. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Ore., tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Ore., tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
People set up cameras and telescopes as they prepare to watch the total eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyo.
Getty Images
People set up cameras and telescopes as they prepare to watch the total eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyo.
Saluki cheerleaders try out eclipse glasses that they were giving out to visitors to Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Saluki cheerleaders try out eclipse glasses that they were giving out to visitors to Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Val Carney, from Asheville, N.C., writes in the sand in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. The city of Isle of Palms hosted a beach party 'Get Eclipsed on IOP'.
Val Carney, from Asheville, N.C., writes in the sand in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, S.C. The city of Isle of Palms hosted a beach party 'Get Eclipsed on IOP'.
In this NASA handout, the moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.
Getty Images
In this NASA handout, the moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.
A Mexican girl looks through a telescope at the beginning of the solar eclipse, at the esplanade of the Museum of Natural History in Mexico City, on Aug. 21, 2017.
AFP/Getty Images
A Mexican girl looks through a telescope at the beginning of the solar eclipse, at the esplanade of the Museum of Natural History in Mexico City, on Aug. 21, 2017.
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Steve Kaltenhauser of Calgary, Canada, watches with the crowd during a total solar eclipse from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience on Aug. 21, 2017 in Madras, Ore.
AFP/Getty Images
Steve Kaltenhauser of Calgary, Canada, watches with the crowd during a total solar eclipse from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience on Aug. 21, 2017 in Madras, Ore.
Julian Ledger, of Los Angeles, photographs the solar eclipse while his wife Shayde Ledger and friend Annemarie Penny, right dance during totality at the Albany Regional Airport in Albany, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Julian Ledger, of Los Angeles, photographs the solar eclipse while his wife Shayde Ledger and friend Annemarie Penny, right dance during totality at the Albany Regional Airport in Albany, Ore., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
The total solar eclipse is viewed from Charleston, S.C., on Aug. 21, 2017.
AFP/Getty Images
The total solar eclipse is viewed from Charleston, S.C., on Aug. 21, 2017.
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump wear protective glasses as they view the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump wear protective glasses as they view the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Members of the Rome Braves watch the eclipse at Spirit Communications Park during a break in  minor league baseball August 21, 2017 in Columbia, S.C.
Getty Images
Members of the Rome Braves watch the eclipse at Spirit Communications Park during a break in minor league baseball August 21, 2017 in Columbia, S.C.
People watch a partial solar eclipse from the roof deck at the 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge on August 21, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Getty Images
People watch a partial solar eclipse from the roof deck at the 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge on August 21, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
A total solar eclipse is seen above the Bald Knob Cross of Peace Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Alto Pass, Ill. More than 700 people visited the over 100 foot cross for the event.
A total solar eclipse is seen above the Bald Knob Cross of Peace Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Alto Pass, Ill. More than 700 people visited the over 100 foot cross for the event.
Projected images of the eclipse is seen through the leaves on the trees on the sidewalk at the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.
Projected images of the eclipse is seen through the leaves on the trees on the sidewalk at the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.

As you well know by now, the solar eclipse will be able to be viewed from coast to coast in the U.S. Here, we compile some of the best videos, tweets and images of preparations and viewing from across the country. Follow NASA's live coverage of the event above, and see other live streams from various places across the country below. View a photo gallery above.


Live stream


NASA TV live


EarthCam (35 locations)

Watch the solar eclipse occur via 45 different camera locations with EarthCam's. Courtesy of EarthCam .


Around the country

The White House


New York


In the skies



Ontario, Ore.


• Memphis, Tenn.

The Memphis Redbirds, Triple-A affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals, designed these special eclipse uniforms. Their game today begins a 11:52 a.m., the exact time the eclipse begins in Memphis. Gotta love minor league baseball marketing.


• Nashville, Tenn.


• Salem, Ore.


• Beatrice, Neb.


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