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Nobel Peace Prize awarded to anti-nuclear campaign group

| Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, 7:09 a.m.
In this Sept. 13, 2017 file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un, right, and the US president Donald Trump, left,  in front of the US embassy in Berlin, Germany. The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins the Nobel Peace Prize. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Geneva-based group 'for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.' (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)
In this Sept. 13, 2017 file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un, right, and the US president Donald Trump, left, in front of the US embassy in Berlin, Germany. The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins the Nobel Peace Prize. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Geneva-based group 'for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.' (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)
Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of Norwegian Nobel Committee, announces that 2017 Nobel Peace Prize goes to ICAN, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in Oslo Friday Oct. 6, 2017. The Nobel committee secretary, Olav Njoelstad stands at right. ( Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)
Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of Norwegian Nobel Committee, announces that 2017 Nobel Peace Prize goes to ICAN, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in Oslo Friday Oct. 6, 2017. The Nobel committee secretary, Olav Njoelstad stands at right. ( Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)
Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of Norwegian Nobel Committee, announces that 2017 Nobel Peace Prize goes to ICAN, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in Oslo Friday Oct. 6, 2017. The Nobel committee secretary, Olav Njoelstad stands at right.. ( Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)
Berit Reiss-Andersen, chair of Norwegian Nobel Committee, announces that 2017 Nobel Peace Prize goes to ICAN, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in Oslo Friday Oct. 6, 2017. The Nobel committee secretary, Olav Njoelstad stands at right.. ( Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix via AP)
In this Sept. 13, 2017 file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un, right, and the US president Donald Trump, left,  in front of the US embassy in Berlin, Germany. The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins the Nobel Peace Prize. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Geneva-based group 'for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.' (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)
In this Sept. 13, 2017 file photo activists of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) protest against the conflict between North Korea and the USA with masks of the North Korean ruler Kim Jong Un, right, and the US president Donald Trump, left, in front of the US embassy in Berlin, Germany. The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins the Nobel Peace Prize. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Geneva-based group 'for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.' (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)

OSLO, Norway — The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to an organization seeking to eliminate nuclear weapons through an international treaty-based prohibition.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday announced the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons as winner of the $1.1 million prize.

The Geneva-based organization ICAN “has been a driving force in prevailing upon the world's nations to pledge to cooperate ... in efforts to stigmatize, prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons,” committee chairwoman Berit Reiss-Andersen said in the announcement.

She noted that similar prohibitions have been reached on chemical and biological weapons, land mines and cluster munitions.

“Nuclear weapons are even more destructive, but have not yet been made the object of a similar international legal prohibition,” she said.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Walsstrom said that giving the prize to ICAN was “well-deserved and timely.”

Walsstrom said that the organization has been working hard since 2007 and “we know how serious the situation is around in the world.”

Reiss-Andersen said “through its inspiring and innovative support for the U.N. negotiations on a treaty banning nuclear weapons, ICAN has played a major part in bringing about what in our day and age is equivalent to an international peace congress.”

Asked by journalists whether the prize was essentially symbolic, given that no international measures against nuclear weapons have been reached, Reiss-Andersen said “What will not have an impact is being passive.”

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