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Storms kill 2 in Poland, raise regional death toll to 9

| Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, 9:48 p.m.
The aerial view shows three uprooted trees at a road near Hildesheim, Germany Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany.
The aerial view shows three uprooted trees at a road near Hildesheim, Germany Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany.
An uprooted tree crashed into the entrance of a subway station photographed in Berlin, Friday Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. In Berlin, where winds reached up to 120 kph (75 mph), flights were temporarily grounded at the city's two airports and much of the public transportation system was shut down.  (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)
An uprooted tree crashed into the entrance of a subway station photographed in Berlin, Friday Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. In Berlin, where winds reached up to 120 kph (75 mph), flights were temporarily grounded at the city's two airports and much of the public transportation system was shut down. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)
Remains of uprooted trees seen at Kurfuerstendamm boulevard  in Berlin, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017.  Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. In Berlin, where winds reached up to 120 kph (75 mph), flights were temporarily grounded at the city's two airports and much of the public transportation system was shut down. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)
Remains of uprooted trees seen at Kurfuerstendamm boulevard in Berlin, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. In Berlin, where winds reached up to 120 kph (75 mph), flights were temporarily grounded at the city's two airports and much of the public transportation system was shut down. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)
In this Oct. 5, 2017 photo firefighters stand near the wreckage  of a truck after an uprooted  tree crashed on the vehicle during a storm near Neu Karstaedt, eastern Germany. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany.   (Jens Buettner/dpa via AP)
In this Oct. 5, 2017 photo firefighters stand near the wreckage of a truck after an uprooted tree crashed on the vehicle during a storm near Neu Karstaedt, eastern Germany. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. (Jens Buettner/dpa via AP)
Firefighters remove uprooted trees in Hannover, Germany, Oct. 5, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany.  (Silas Stein/dpa via AP)
Firefighters remove uprooted trees in Hannover, Germany, Oct. 5, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. (Silas Stein/dpa via AP)
Passengers crowd in the main train station in Berlin, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. Train connections in several northern states were shut down, including links to and from Berlin, because of the danger from branches over the tracks. Germany rail company Deutsche Bahn opened stationary trains to travelers left stranded by cancellations. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)
Passengers crowd in the main train station in Berlin, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Seven people died Thursday as high winds knocked over trees and caused widespread travel chaos in northern Germany. Train connections in several northern states were shut down, including links to and from Berlin, because of the danger from branches over the tracks. Germany rail company Deutsche Bahn opened stationary trains to travelers left stranded by cancellations. (Maurizio Gambarini/dpa via AP)

WARSAW, Poland — A heavy storm ravaged parts of western Poland overnight, killing two people and raising the death toll in the region to nine.

High winds also killed seven people in neighboring Germany late Thursday.

Pawel Fratczak, a spokesman for Polish firefighters, said Friday that tens of thousands of households were without electricity after falling trees broke power lines.

The storm killed a 67-year-old man who was trying to secure his house's roof and a 58-year-old woman crushed by a falling tree. Officials said 39 people were also injured.

Prime Minister Beata Szydlo visited the town of Zielona Gora, located in an area hardest hit, meeting with local officials and promising financial help for repairs.

Firefighters also worked Friday to remove fallen trees and help secure hundreds of damaged roofs.

The storm also devastated the park of the Habsburg Palace in the town of Zywiec.

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