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Man rescues rabbit from wildfire along California highway

Matt Rosenberg
| Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, 9:30 a.m.
KABC
Two firefighters watch as a home burns in a wildfire in La Conchita, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Two firefighters watch as a home burns in a wildfire in La Conchita, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Firefighter Ryan Spencer battles a wildfire as it burns along a hillside toward homes in La Conchita, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Firefighter Ryan Spencer battles a wildfire as it burns along a hillside toward homes in La Conchita, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. The wind-swept blazes have forced tens of thousands of evacuations and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Flames from the Thomas fire burn above a truck on Highway 101 north of Ventura, Calif., on Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
Flames from the Thomas fire burn above a truck on Highway 101 north of Ventura, Calif., on Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Mark one for the good guys.

A videographer captured a heartbreaking-turned-heartwarming moment when a man along a freeway helped rescue a rabbit while the hellish wildfires in southern California continued to rage.

KABC in Los Angeles reported the video was recorded Wednedsay night along Highway 1 in La Conchita.

The man pulled over and was in a visible panic as the rabbit scurried toward the flames.

He can be seen anxiously jumping as the rabbit moves closer to the flames before making its way back. The man was able to lure the rabbit closer before gently picking it up and holding it in his arms to calm it down.

The largest and most destructive wildfire in Southern California has grown to 140 square miles and fire officials say the worst may be yet to come.

The 90,000-acre fire burning in Ventura County northwest of Los Angeles has swept through ridges and canyons to the sea and Santa Ana winds that drove it are expected to return with a vengeance overnight.

State fire director Ken Pimlott says winds that eased in the afternoon could return with gusts up to 80 mph Thursday that would make it impossible to fight the fire.

Dozens of homes have burned since the blaze erupted Monday. Nearly 1,800 firefighters and a fleet of aircraft are fighting the flames but the blaze is only 5 percent contained and an estimated 12,000 buildings are in danger.

The Associated Press contributed.

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