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Late-night comedians pounce on Trump's slurred word in Jerusalem speech

Frank Carnevale
| Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, 12:48 p.m.
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens at left. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens at left. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens at right. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens at right. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump delivers a statement on Jerusalem from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington, DC on December 6, 2017 as Vice President Mike Pence looks on.
AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump delivers a statement on Jerusalem from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington, DC on December 6, 2017 as Vice President Mike Pence looks on.
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. Vice President Mike Pence listens. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Trump declared that the United States would recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel in a speech Wednesday - a contentious move that alarmed allies and outraged some groups.

But what caught some people's attention was Trump's slurred words towards the end of the speech.

He slurred several parts of his address, but the most jarring came at the end as he finished with, "Thank you. God bless Israel. God bless the Palestinian. And God bless the United States." where he garbled the "United States."

Trump's full remarks can be watched below:

Many took to analyzing the slurred words.

CNN's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta watched the lip and said in a story, "You could call it slurring or just a little bit of difficulty forming the words."

Late night comedians took the opportunity to roast the president on the garbled words.

CBS's Stephen Colbert played the clip several times for laughs.

The "Daily Show" host Trevor Noah raised the possibility that the slurred words were because of a dental issue.

According to a Los Angeles Times report, White House spokesman Raj Shah explained away the slurred words, "His throat was dry. There's nothing to it."

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