ShareThis Page
World

Trump lands in San Diego to view border wall prototypes

| Tuesday, March 13, 2018, 3:18 p.m.
Jill Green holds a sign during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump, Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego, Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.
Jill Green holds a sign during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump, Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego, Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.
People march during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump, Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego, Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.
People march during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump, Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego, Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.
Ariel Norcross holds a sign during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump on Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego on Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.
Ariel Norcross holds a sign during a rally against a scheduled upcoming visit by President Donald Trump on Monday, March 12, 2018, in San Diego. Trump is scheduled to visit San Diego on Tuesday, setting foot in California for his first time as president.

SAN DIEGO — President Donald Trump arrived in California on Tuesday to view prototypes for his “big beautiful border wall” amid protests and growing tensions between his administration and the state over immigration enforcement.

Chanting “No ban! No wall!” demonstrators were cheered on by honking cars and buses at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego, the nation's busiest border crossing.

Trump's visit coincided with an escalating war of words between his administration and the liberal state, which Democrat Hillary Clinton easily carried in the 2016 presidential election. California officials have defiantly refused to help federal agents detain and deport immigrants in the U.S. illegally, and the Justice Department sued the state last week over three of its immigration laws.

The president, who arrived in San Diego on Tuesday afternoon, planned to inspect eight towering prototypes for the wall in an area of the border heavily cordoned off and far from the rallies on the U.S. side. He was then expected to address Marines before attending a high-dollar fundraiser in Los Angeles, where he'll be staying overnight.

Protests were planned on the Mexican side, too, in Tijuana. Semitrucks were parked in between the row of prototypes and the border, blocking the view from Mexico.

Demonstrators said they planned to later line up and greet people walking into the United States at the San Ysidro crossing to show Americans welcome immigrants.

José Gonzalez, 21, stopped to snap a photo of the protesters holding signs, including one that read: “Wall off Putin!” in reference to Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has a seemingly close relationship with Trump.

“I don't think it's really fair how he has the choice to separate us,” said Gonzalez, a dual citizen who lives in Tijuana and crosses the border daily to work at a San Diego ramen restaurant.

Army veteran Mark Prieto, 48, shook his head as he walked by the protest.

“People are so narrow-minded,” the Riverside firefighter said as the crowd chanted. “Finally we have someone who is putting America first.”

His wife, Corina Prieto, a nurse who has extended family in Mexico, agreed. Both voted for Trump.

“I think he is doing a lot of good, like protecting our Border Patrol,” she said.

Trump was expected Tuesday to be briefed on lessons learned from the construction of the prototypes built in San Diego last fall. He also will meet with border agents and officers to ask what they need, Homeland Security spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said.

The president also planned to talk about sanctuary cities, arguing that they are a major threat to public safety and national security, according to a senior administration official, who wasn't authorized to speak publicly about Trump's planned remarks and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Trump will not meet with any elected officials during his visit and is not traveling with any members of Congress, the official said.

San Diego's Republican mayor criticized Trump's planned short visit, saying the president won't get a full picture of the city. Kevin Faulconer said a popular cross-border airport terminal connecting San Diego and Tijuana shows that “building bridges has worked wonders.”

Faulconer, writing in The San Diego Union-Tribune, also said San Diego police work to protect everyone regardless of immigration status, an apparent dig at Trump's push to target illegal immigration.

Trump tweeted about California's immigration policies as he flew to the state aboard Air Force One.

“California's sanctuary policies are illegal and unconstitutional and put the safety and security of our entire nation at risk. Thousands of dangerous & violent criminal aliens are released as a result of sanctuary policies, set free to prey on innocent Americans. THIS MUST STOP!” he wrote.

This isn't Trump's first visit to the border. He traveled to Laredo — one of Texas' safest cities — weeks after declaring his candidacy in June 2015.

Trump told reporters then that he was putting himself “in great danger” by coming to the border. But, he said, “I have to do it. I love this country.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me