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Missiles, troops installed at Syrian border

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By From Wire Reports
Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, 7:12 p.m.
 

As fears grow in the West that Syrian President Bashar Assad will use chemical weapons as an act of desperation, NATO moved forward on Thursday with its plan to place Patriot missiles and troops along Syria's border with Turkey to protect against potential attacks.

Assad's regime blasted the move as “psychological warfare,” saying the new deployment would not deter it from seeking victory over rebels it views as terrorists.

The missile deployment sends a clear message to Assad that consequences will follow if he uses chemical weapons or strikes NATO member Turkey, which backs the rebels seeking his ouster. But its limited scope also reflects the low appetite in Western capitals for direct military intervention in the civil war.

The United States and many European and Arab countries called for Assad to step down early in the uprising but have struggled to make that happen. Russia and China have protected Assad from censure by the U.N. Security Council, and the presence of extremists among the rebels makes the United States and others nervous about arming them.

In Dublin, Ireland, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joined Russia's foreign minister and the U.N. peace envoy to the Arab country for three-way talks that suggested Washington and Moscow were working toward a common strategy as the Assad regime weakens.

The diplomatic efforts to end the civil war occur days after NATO agreed to post Patriot missiles and troops along Turkey's southern border with Syria after mortars and shells from Syria killed five Turks.

“Events on the ground in Syria are accelerating, and we see that in many different ways,” Clinton said, before the meeting. “The pressure against the regime in and around Damascus seems to be increasing. We've made it clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons,” which President Obama called a “red line” that would trigger U.S. intervention.

Germany's cabinet approved the move on Thursday, and German Defense Minister Thomas de Maiziere told reporters that the overall mission is expected to include two batteries each from the Netherlands and the United States, plus 400 soldiers and monitoring aircraft.

“Nobody knows what such a regime is capable of and that is why we are acting protectively here,” said German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle.

The Assad regime said the NATO deployment would not make Assad change course, calling the talk of chemical weapons part of a conspiracy to justify future intervention.

“The Turkish step and NATO's support for it are provocative moves that constitute psychological warfare,” Syria's Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad said in an interview with Lebanon's Al-Manar TV.

 

 
 


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