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Coffee that's good to the last ... dropping?

AP
Asleigh Nelson, 32, an American tourist from Tampa, Fla., tastes a cup of Black Ivory coffee at a hotel restaurant in northern Thailand. AP

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, 9:16 p.m.
 

GOLDEN TRIANGLE, Thailand — In the lush hills of northern Thailand, a herd of 20 elephants is excreting some of the world's most expensive coffee.

Trumpeted as earthy in flavor and smooth on the palate, the exotic new brew is made from beans eaten by Thai elephants and plucked a day later from their dung. A gut reaction inside the elephant creates what its founder calls the coffee's unique taste.

Stomach turning or oddly alluring, this is not just one of the world's most unusual specialty coffees. At $500 per pound, it's also among the world's priciest.

Black Ivory Coffee was introduced last month at luxury hotels in remote corners of the world including northern Thailand with the price tag of about $50 a serving.

 

 
 


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